This spectacular image from the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope is the first clear image of a planet caught in the very act of formation around the dwarf star PDS 70. The planet stands clearly out, visible as a bright point to the right of the centre of the image, which is blacked out by the coronagraph mask used to block the blinding light of the central star. Credit: ESO/A. Müller et al.

First Confirmed Image of Newborn Planet Caught with ESO’s VLT

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Colorful view of universe as seen by Hubble in 2014. NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

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Translating the signals. Chirs Foster, Author provided

How my astronomy data from the Lovell telescope was used to create an immersive light and sound show

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Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

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Triple star system involving a pulsar suggests Einstein was right. Kevin Gill/Flickr, CC BY-ND

Free-falling dead stars show that a cornerstone of physics holds up

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When galaxies align. NASA

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter

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Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF., Author provided

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death

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About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch?

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Artist impression of very young galaxy in the early universe. Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF; S. Dagnello

ALMA Finds Most-Distant Oxygen in the Universe

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The dark band is the Dark Doodad Nebula, a place where new stars and planets can form. Flickr/cafuego, CC BY-SA

A giant ‘singing’ cloud in space will help us to understand how star systems form

A giant ‘singing’ cloud in space will help us to understand how star systems form The dark band is the Dark Doodad Nebula, a place…

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X-ray “heartbeats” of two different black holes that ingest gas from their companion stars. GRS 1915 has nearly five times the mass of IGR J17091, which at three solar masses may be the smallest black hole known. Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’

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Top-down artist depiction of a tiny black hole and a pileup of gas and matter swirling toward the center. NASA

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after ‘listening’ to the universe

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after ‘listening’ to the universe Top-down artist depiction of a tiny black hole and a pileup of gas and…

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