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Hubble Cashes in Abell’s Richest Cluster

The Universe contains some truly massive objects. Although we are still unsure how such gigantic things come to be, the current leading theory is known as hierarchical clustering, whereby small clumps of matter collide and merge to grow ever larger. The 14-billion-year history of the Universe has seen the formation of some enormous cosmic structures, including galaxy groups, clusters, and superclusters — the largest known structures in the cosmos! This particular cluster is called Abell 665. It was named after its discoverer, George O. Abell, who included it in his seminal 1958 cluster catalogue. Abell 665 is located in the well-known northern constellation of Ursa Major (The Great Bear). This incredible image combines visible and infrared light gathered by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope using two of its cameras: the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. Abell 665 is the only galaxy cluster in Abell’s entire catalogue to be given a richness class of 5, indicating that the cluster contains at least 300 individual galaxies. Because of this richness, the cluster has been studied extensively at all wavelengths, resulting in a number of fascinating discoveries — among other research, Abell 665 has been found to host a giant radio halo, powerful shockwaves, and has been used to calculate an updated value for the Hubble constant (a measure of how fast the Universe is expanding). Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Cashes in Abell’s Richest Cluster

Hubble Cashes in Abell’s Richest Cluster The Universe contains some truly massive objects. Although we are still unsure how such gigantic things come to be, the current leading theory is known as hierarchical clustering, whereby small clumps of matter collide and merge to grow ever […]

Hubble discovers “wobbling galaxies”

Abell S1063, a galaxy cluster, was observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope as part of the Frontier Fields programme. The huge mass of the cluster acts as a cosmic magnifying glass and enlarges even more distant galaxies, so they become bright enough for Hubble to see. Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Lotz (STScI)

Hubble discovers “wobbling galaxies”

Hubble discovers “wobbling galaxies” Using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered that the brightest galaxies within galaxy clusters “wobble” relative to the cluster’s centre of mass. This unexpected result is inconsistent with predictions made by the current standard model of dark matter. With […]

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation As far as galaxies are concerned, size can be deceptive. Some of the largest galaxies in the Universe are dormant, while some dwarf galaxies, such as ESO 553-46 imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, can produce […]

How we found our lost Mars lander after a decade of searching – and what’s next

Images of the lost Beagle 2. Author provided

How we found our lost Mars lander after a decade of searching – and what’s next

How we found our lost Mars lander after a decade of searching – and what’s next Images of the lost Beagle 2. Author provided John Bridges, University of Leicester The last picture taken of the Mars lander Beagle 2 showed it being successfully ejected from […]

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula

At a distance of just 160 000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighbourhood — the Tarantula Nebula. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked “bubbles” that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula (to the lower left). The Honeycomb Nebula was found serendipitously by astronomers using ESO’s New Technology Telescope to image the nearby SN1987A, the closest observed supernova to Earth for over 400 years. The nebula’s strange bubble-like shape has baffled astronomers since its discovery in the early 1990s. Various theories have been proposed to explain its unique structure, some more exotic than others. In 2010, a group of astronomers studied the nebula and, using advanced data analysis and computer modelling, came to the conclusion that its unique appearance is likely due to the combined effect of two supernovae — a more recent explosion has pierced the expanding shell of material created by an older explosion. The nebula’s especially striking appearance is suspected to be due to a fortuitous viewing angle; the honeycomb effect of the circular shells may not be visible from another viewpoint. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula At a distance of just 160,000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist […]

NASA’s Webb Telescope to Witness Galactic Infancy

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field is a snapshot of about 10,000 galaxies in a tiny patch of sky, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Credits: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), the HUDF Team

NASA’s Webb Telescope to Witness Galactic Infancy

NASA’s Webb Telescope to Witness Galactic Infancy Scientists will use NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to study sections of the sky previously observed by NASA’s Great Observatories, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, to understand the creation of the universe’s first […]

ALMA and Rosetta Detect Freon-40 in Space

Organohalogen methyl chloride (Freon-40) discovered by ALMA around the infant stars in IRAS 16293-2422. These same organic compounds were discovered in the thin atmosphere surrounding Comet 67P/C-G by the ROSINA instrument on ESA's Rosetta space probe. Credit: B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA

ALMA and Rosetta Detect Freon-40 in Space

ALMA and Rosetta Detect Freon-40 in Space Observations made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and ESA’s Rosetta mission, have revealed the presence of the organohalogen Freon-40 in gas around both an infant star and a comet. Organohalogens are formed by organic processes on […]

How a new orbital moon station could take us to Mars and beyond

A NASA Orion craft brings a crew to the Deep Space Gateway in lunar orbit (artist’s impression) NASA

How a new orbital moon station could take us to Mars and beyond

How a new orbital moon station could take us to Mars and beyond Full moon photographed from Earth. Gregory H. Revera/wikimedia, CC BY-SA David Rothery, The Open University The dream of a human habitat in orbit about the moon came a step closer on September […]

Revealed today, Elon Musk’s new space vision took us from Earth to Mars, and back home again

When will we see a woman or a man walk on Mars? from www.shutterstock.com

Revealed today, Elon Musk’s new space vision took us from Earth to Mars, and back home again

Revealed today, Elon Musk’s new space vision took us from Earth to Mars, and back home again When will we see a woman or a man walk on Mars? from www.shutterstock.com Sarah Keenihan, The Conversation In front of a huge SpaceX multimedia slide presentation, the […]