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Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation As far as galaxies are concerned, size can be deceptive. Some of the largest galaxies in the Universe are dormant, while some dwarf galaxies, such as ESO 553-46 imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, can produce […]

How we found our lost Mars lander after a decade of searching – and what’s next

Images of the lost Beagle 2. Author provided

How we found our lost Mars lander after a decade of searching – and what’s next

How we found our lost Mars lander after a decade of searching – and what’s next Images of the lost Beagle 2. Author provided John Bridges, University of Leicester The last picture taken of the Mars lander Beagle 2 showed it being successfully ejected from […]

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula

At a distance of just 160 000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighbourhood — the Tarantula Nebula. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked “bubbles” that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula (to the lower left). The Honeycomb Nebula was found serendipitously by astronomers using ESO’s New Technology Telescope to image the nearby SN1987A, the closest observed supernova to Earth for over 400 years. The nebula’s strange bubble-like shape has baffled astronomers since its discovery in the early 1990s. Various theories have been proposed to explain its unique structure, some more exotic than others. In 2010, a group of astronomers studied the nebula and, using advanced data analysis and computer modelling, came to the conclusion that its unique appearance is likely due to the combined effect of two supernovae — a more recent explosion has pierced the expanding shell of material created by an older explosion. The nebula’s especially striking appearance is suspected to be due to a fortuitous viewing angle; the honeycomb effect of the circular shells may not be visible from another viewpoint. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula At a distance of just 160,000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist […]

NASA’s Webb Telescope to Witness Galactic Infancy

The Hubble Ultra Deep Field is a snapshot of about 10,000 galaxies in a tiny patch of sky, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Credits: NASA, ESA, S. Beckwith (STScI), the HUDF Team

NASA’s Webb Telescope to Witness Galactic Infancy

NASA’s Webb Telescope to Witness Galactic Infancy Scientists will use NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to study sections of the sky previously observed by NASA’s Great Observatories, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope, to understand the creation of the universe’s first […]

ALMA and Rosetta Detect Freon-40 in Space

Organohalogen methyl chloride (Freon-40) discovered by ALMA around the infant stars in IRAS 16293-2422. These same organic compounds were discovered in the thin atmosphere surrounding Comet 67P/C-G by the ROSINA instrument on ESA's Rosetta space probe. Credit: B. Saxton (NRAO/AUI/NSF); NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA

ALMA and Rosetta Detect Freon-40 in Space

ALMA and Rosetta Detect Freon-40 in Space Observations made with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and ESA’s Rosetta mission, have revealed the presence of the organohalogen Freon-40 in gas around both an infant star and a comet. Organohalogens are formed by organic processes on […]

How a new orbital moon station could take us to Mars and beyond

A NASA Orion craft brings a crew to the Deep Space Gateway in lunar orbit (artist’s impression) NASA

How a new orbital moon station could take us to Mars and beyond

How a new orbital moon station could take us to Mars and beyond Full moon photographed from Earth. Gregory H. Revera/wikimedia, CC BY-SA David Rothery, The Open University The dream of a human habitat in orbit about the moon came a step closer on September […]

Revealed today, Elon Musk’s new space vision took us from Earth to Mars, and back home again

When will we see a woman or a man walk on Mars? from www.shutterstock.com

Revealed today, Elon Musk’s new space vision took us from Earth to Mars, and back home again

Revealed today, Elon Musk’s new space vision took us from Earth to Mars, and back home again When will we see a woman or a man walk on Mars? from www.shutterstock.com Sarah Keenihan, The Conversation In front of a huge SpaceX multimedia slide presentation, the […]

Hubble’s Cool Galaxy with a Hot Corona

Despite the advances made in past decades, the process of galaxy formation remains an open question in astronomy. Various theories have been suggested, but since galaxies come in all shapes and sizes — including elliptical, spiral, and irregular — no single theory has so far been able to satisfactorily explain the origins of all the galaxies we see throughout the Universe. To determine which formation model is correct (if any), astronomers hunt for the telltale signs of various physical processes. One example of this is galactic coronas, which are huge, invisible regions of hot gas that surround a galaxy’s visible bulk, forming a spheroidal shape. They are so hot that they can be detected by their X-ray emission, far beyond  the optical radius of the galaxy. Because they are so wispy, these coronas are extremely difficult to detect. In 2013, astronomers highlighted NGC 6753, imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, as one of only two known spiral galaxies that were both massive enough and close enough to permit detailed observations of their coronas. Of course, NGC 6753 is only close in astronomical terms — the galaxy is nearly 150 million light-years from Earth. NGC 6753 is a whirl of colour in this image — the bursts of blue throughout the spiral arms are regions filled with young stars glowing brightly in ultraviolet light, while redder areas are filled with older stars emitting in the cooler near-infrared.   Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

Hubble’s Cool Galaxy with a Hot Corona

Hubble’s Cool Galaxy with a Hot Corona Galaxy NGC 6753, imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is a whirl of color — the bursts of blue throughout the spiral arms are regions filled with young stars glowing brightly in ultraviolet light, while redder […]