Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement…

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This photo of Jupiter, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, was snapped when the planet was comparatively close to Earth, at a distance of 415 million miles. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (NASA Goddard)

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to Target Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to Target Jupiter’s Great Red Spot NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, the most ambitious and complex space observatory ever built,…

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The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula. NASA/John Sonntag, CC BY

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula.…

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The 35 m-diameter dish antenna of ESA’s deep-space tracking station at New Norcia, Western Australia. europeanspaceagency/flickr , CC BY

The big global space agencies rely on Australia – let’s turn that to our advantage

The big global space agencies rely on Australia – let’s turn that to our advantage The 35 m-diameter dish antenna of ESA’s deep-space tracking station…

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A ripple of bright blue threads through this galaxy like a misshapen lake system. The foreground of this image is littered with nearby stars with their gleaming diffraction spikes. A keen eye can also spot a few other galaxies that, while masquerading as stars at first glance, reveal their true nature on closer inspection. The central galaxy streaked with colour, IC 4870, was discovered by DeLisle Stewart in 1900 and is located approximately 28 million light-years away. It contains an active galactic nucleus, or AGN: an extremely luminous central region so alight with radiation that it can outshine the rest of the galaxy put together. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Images a Galaxy with Threads of Blue

Hubble Images a Galaxy with Threads of Blue A ripple of bright blue gas threads through this galaxy like a misshapen lake system. The foreground…

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The Curiosity rover on Mars has been busy. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Rover detects ancient organic material on Mars – and it could be trace of past life

Rover detects ancient organic material on Mars – and it could be trace of past life The Curiosity rover on Mars has been busy. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS…

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This image, taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), both installed on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the peculiar galaxy NGC 3256. The galaxy is about 100 million light-years from Earth and is the result of a past galactic merger, which created its distorted appearance. As such, NGC 3256 provides an ideal target to investigate starbursts that have been triggered by galaxy mergers. Another image of NGC 3256 was already released in 2008, as part of a collection of interacting galaxies, created for Hubble’s 18th birthday. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness Though it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site…

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At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in space; they swarm together, gathered up by the unyielding hand of gravity, to form groups and clusters. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, which is part of the Virgo Cluster, which in turn is part of the 100 000-galaxy-strong Laniakea Supercluster. The galaxy cluster seen in this image is known as SDSS J0333+0651. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the…

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This image shows the galaxy NGC 6744, about 30 million light-years away. It is one of 50 galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope’s Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe, offering an extensive resource for understanding the complexities of star formation and galaxy evolution. The image is a composite using both ultraviolet light and visible light, gathered with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the LEGUS team

Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet

Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet Using the unparalleled sharpness and ultraviolet observational capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of…

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Resembling a wizard’s staff set aglow, NGC 1032 cleaves the quiet darkness of space in two in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 1032 is located about a hundred million light years away in the constellation Cetus (The Sea Monster). Although beautiful, this image perhaps does not do justice to the galaxy’s true aesthetic appeal: NGC 1032 is actually a spectacular spiral galaxy, but from Earth, the galaxy’s vast disc of gas, dust and stars is seen nearly edge-on. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Catches a Spiral Galaxy in Disguise

Hubble Catches a Spiral Galaxy in Disguise Resembling a wizard’s staff set aglow, NGC 1032 cleaves the quiet darkness of space in two in this…

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These six images represent the variety of star-forming regions in nearby galaxies. The galaxies are part of the Hubble Space Telescope's Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe. The six images consist of two dwarf galaxies (UGC 5340 and UGCA 281) and four large spiral galaxies (NGC 3368, NGC 3627, NGC 6744, and NGC 4258). The images are a blend of ultraviolet light and visible light from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credits: NASA/ESA/LEGUS team

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies Capitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, an international team…

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