Artist's illustration and X-ray image of "red nugget" galaxy Mrk 1216. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MTA-Eötvös University/N. Werner et al., Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers About a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called “red nuggets.” A new…

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Mission specialist Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly in space. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering

Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering Mission specialist Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly…

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A ripple of bright blue threads through this galaxy like a misshapen lake system. The foreground of this image is littered with nearby stars with their gleaming diffraction spikes. A keen eye can also spot a few other galaxies that, while masquerading as stars at first glance, reveal their true nature on closer inspection. The central galaxy streaked with colour, IC 4870, was discovered by DeLisle Stewart in 1900 and is located approximately 28 million light-years away. It contains an active galactic nucleus, or AGN: an extremely luminous central region so alight with radiation that it can outshine the rest of the galaxy put together. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Images a Galaxy with Threads of Blue

Hubble Images a Galaxy with Threads of Blue A ripple of bright blue gas threads through this galaxy like a misshapen lake system. The foreground…

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Analysis of asteroids like Lutetia was used in the Josef Hanuš-led paper on asteroid thermophysical modeling. Lutetia is a large main belt asteroid about 62 miles (100 kilometers) in diameter. Lutetia was visited by ESA's Rosetta spacecraft in 2010. Credits: ESA 2010 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

NEOWISE Thermal Data Reveal Surface Properties of Over 100 Asteroids

NEOWISE Thermal Data Reveal Surface Properties of Over 100 Asteroids Nearly all asteroids are so far away and so small that the astronomical community only…

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This image, taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), both installed on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the peculiar galaxy NGC 3256. The galaxy is about 100 million light-years from Earth and is the result of a past galactic merger, which created its distorted appearance. As such, NGC 3256 provides an ideal target to investigate starbursts that have been triggered by galaxy mergers. Another image of NGC 3256 was already released in 2008, as part of a collection of interacting galaxies, created for Hubble’s 18th birthday. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness Though it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site…

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A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

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At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in space; they swarm together, gathered up by the unyielding hand of gravity, to form groups and clusters. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, which is part of the Virgo Cluster, which in turn is part of the 100 000-galaxy-strong Laniakea Supercluster. The galaxy cluster seen in this image is known as SDSS J0333+0651. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the…

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This image shows the galaxy NGC 6744, about 30 million light-years away. It is one of 50 galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope’s Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe, offering an extensive resource for understanding the complexities of star formation and galaxy evolution. The image is a composite using both ultraviolet light and visible light, gathered with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the LEGUS team

Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet

Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet Using the unparalleled sharpness and ultraviolet observational capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of…

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Resembling a wizard’s staff set aglow, NGC 1032 cleaves the quiet darkness of space in two in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 1032 is located about a hundred million light years away in the constellation Cetus (The Sea Monster). Although beautiful, this image perhaps does not do justice to the galaxy’s true aesthetic appeal: NGC 1032 is actually a spectacular spiral galaxy, but from Earth, the galaxy’s vast disc of gas, dust and stars is seen nearly edge-on. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Catches a Spiral Galaxy in Disguise

Hubble Catches a Spiral Galaxy in Disguise Resembling a wizard’s staff set aglow, NGC 1032 cleaves the quiet darkness of space in two in this…

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These six images represent the variety of star-forming regions in nearby galaxies. The galaxies are part of the Hubble Space Telescope's Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe. The six images consist of two dwarf galaxies (UGC 5340 and UGCA 281) and four large spiral galaxies (NGC 3368, NGC 3627, NGC 6744, and NGC 4258). The images are a blend of ultraviolet light and visible light from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credits: NASA/ESA/LEGUS team

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies Capitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, an international team…

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The exoplanet WASP-107b is a gas giant, orbiting a highly active K-type main sequence star. The star is about 200 light-years from Earth. Using spectroscopy, scientists were able to find helium in the escaping atmosphere of the planet — the first detection of this element in the atmosphere of an exoplanet. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA, M. Kornmesser

Hubble detects helium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time

Hubble detects helium in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have detected helium in the…

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Seventeen years ago, astronomers witnessed supernova 2001ig go off 40 million light-years away in the galaxy NGC 7424, in the southern constellation Grus, the Crane. Shortly after, scientists photographed the supernova with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in 2002. Two years later, they followed up with the Gemini South Observatory, which hinted at the presence of a surviving binary companion. As the supernova’s glow faded, scientists focused Hubble on that location in 2016. They pinpointed and photographed the surviving companion, which was possible only due to Hubble’s exquisite resolution and ultraviolet sensitivity. Hubble observations of SN 2001ig provide the best evidence yet that some supernovas originate in double-star systems. Credits: NASA, ESA, S. Ryder (Australian Astronomical Observatory), and O. Fox (STScI)

Stellar Thief Is the Surviving Companion to a Supernova

Stellar Thief Is the Surviving Companion to a Supernova Seventeen years ago, astronomers witnessed a supernova go off 40 million light-years away in the galaxy…

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To celebrate its 28th anniversary in space the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope took this amazing and colourful image of the Lagoon Nebula. The whole nebula, about 4000 light-years away, is an incredible 55 light-years wide and 20 light-years tall. This image shows only a small part of this turbulent star-formation region, about four light-years across. This stunning nebula was first catalogued in 1654 by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Battista Hodierna, who sought to record nebulous objects in the night sky so they would not be mistaken for comets. Since Hodierna’s observations, the Lagoon Nebula has been photographed and analysed by many telescopes and astronomers all over the world. The observations were taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 between 12 February and 18 February 2018. Credit: NASA, ESA, STScI

Hubble celebrates 28th anniversary with a trip through the Lagoon Nebula

Hubble celebrates 28th anniversary with a trip through the Lagoon Nebula This colourful cloud of glowing interstellar gas is just a tiny part of the…

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These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble’s 28th anniversary in space. Credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast…

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