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Hubble

NASA Missions Catch First Light from a Gravitational-Wave Event

Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab

NASA Missions Catch First Light from a Gravitational-Wave Event

NASA Missions Catch First Light from a Gravitational-Wave Event For the first time, NASA scientists have detected light tied to a gravitational-wave event, thanks to two merging neutron stars in the galaxy NGC 4993, located about 130 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Hydra. […]

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation

Hubble’s Compact Galaxy with Big-Time Star Formation As far as galaxies are concerned, size can be deceptive. Some of the largest galaxies in the Universe are dormant, while some dwarf galaxies, such as ESO 553-46 imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, can produce […]

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula

At a distance of just 160 000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist anywhere in our galactic neighbourhood — the Tarantula Nebula. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows both the spindly, spidery filaments of gas that inspired the region’s name, and the intriguing structure of stacked “bubbles” that forms the so-called Honeycomb Nebula (to the lower left). The Honeycomb Nebula was found serendipitously by astronomers using ESO’s New Technology Telescope to image the nearby SN1987A, the closest observed supernova to Earth for over 400 years. The nebula’s strange bubble-like shape has baffled astronomers since its discovery in the early 1990s. Various theories have been proposed to explain its unique structure, some more exotic than others. In 2010, a group of astronomers studied the nebula and, using advanced data analysis and computer modelling, came to the conclusion that its unique appearance is likely due to the combined effect of two supernovae — a more recent explosion has pierced the expanding shell of material created by an older explosion. The nebula’s especially striking appearance is suspected to be due to a fortuitous viewing angle; the honeycomb effect of the circular shells may not be visible from another viewpoint. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgements: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula

Hubble’s Bubbles in the Tarantula Nebula At a distance of just 160,000 light-years, the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of the Milky Way’s closest companions. It is also home to one of the largest and most intense regions of active star formation known to exist […]

NASA’s Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows a fuzzy cloud of dust, called a coma, surrounding the comet C/2017 K2 PANSTARRS (K2), the farthest active comet ever observed entering the solar system. The image was taken in June 2017 by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3. Credits: NASA, ESA, and D. Jewitt (UCLA)

NASA’s Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen

NASA’s Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has photographed the farthest active inbound comet ever seen, at a whopping distance of 1.5 billion miles from the Sun (beyond Saturn’s orbit). Slightly warmed by the remote Sun, it has […]

Hubble’s Cool Galaxy with a Hot Corona

Despite the advances made in past decades, the process of galaxy formation remains an open question in astronomy. Various theories have been suggested, but since galaxies come in all shapes and sizes — including elliptical, spiral, and irregular — no single theory has so far been able to satisfactorily explain the origins of all the galaxies we see throughout the Universe. To determine which formation model is correct (if any), astronomers hunt for the telltale signs of various physical processes. One example of this is galactic coronas, which are huge, invisible regions of hot gas that surround a galaxy’s visible bulk, forming a spheroidal shape. They are so hot that they can be detected by their X-ray emission, far beyond  the optical radius of the galaxy. Because they are so wispy, these coronas are extremely difficult to detect. In 2013, astronomers highlighted NGC 6753, imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, as one of only two known spiral galaxies that were both massive enough and close enough to permit detailed observations of their coronas. Of course, NGC 6753 is only close in astronomical terms — the galaxy is nearly 150 million light-years from Earth. NGC 6753 is a whirl of colour in this image — the bursts of blue throughout the spiral arms are regions filled with young stars glowing brightly in ultraviolet light, while redder areas are filled with older stars emitting in the cooler near-infrared.   Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

Hubble’s Cool Galaxy with a Hot Corona

Hubble’s Cool Galaxy with a Hot Corona Galaxy NGC 6753, imaged here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is a whirl of color — the bursts of blue throughout the spiral arms are regions filled with young stars glowing brightly in ultraviolet light, while redder […]

NASA’s Hubble Captures Blistering Pitch-Black Planet

This illustration shows one of the darkest known exoplanets - an alien world as black as fresh asphalt - orbiting a star like our Sun. The day side of the planet, called WASP-12b, eats light rather than reflects it into space. The exoplanet, which is twice the size of Jupiter, has the unique capability to trap at least 94 percent of the visible starlight falling into its atmosphere. The temperature of the atmosphere is a seething 4,600 degrees Fahrenheit, which is as hot as a small star.The day side hordes all the visible light because it always faces its star. The planet orbits so close to its host that it has fixed day and night sides. WASP-12b is about 2 million miles away from its star and completes an orbit once a day. The night side is much cooler, with temperatures roughly 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit, which allows water vapor and clouds to form. A swirl of material from the planet's super-heated atmosphere is spilling onto its star.This oddball exoplanet is one of a class of so-called "hot Jupiters" that orbit very close to their host star and are heated to enormous temperatures. Credits: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI)

NASA’s Hubble Captures Blistering Pitch-Black Planet

NASA’s Hubble Captures Blistering Pitch-Black Planet NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has observed a planet outside our solar system that looks as black as fresh asphalt because it eats light rather than reflecting it back into space. This light-eating prowess is due to the planet’s unique […]