These simulated views of the ultrahot Jupiter WASP-121b show what the planet might look like to the human eye from five different vantage points, illuminated to different degrees by its parent star. The images were created using a computer simulation being used to help scientists understand the atmospheres of these ultra-hot planets. Ultrahot Jupiters reflect almost no light, rather like charcoal. However, the daysides of ultrahot Jupiters have temperatures of between 3600°F and 5400°F (2000°C and 3000°C), so the planets produce their own glow, like a hot ember. The orange color in this simulated image is thus from the planet's own heat. The computer model was based on observations of WASP-121b conducted using NASA's Spitzer and Hubble space telescopes. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Vivien Parmentier/Aix-Marseille University (AMU)

Water Is Destroyed, Then Reborn in Ultrahot Jupiters

Water Is Destroyed, Then Reborn in Ultrahot Jupiters Imagine a place where the weather forecast is always the same: scorching temperatures, relentlessly sunny, and with…

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Colorful view of universe as seen by Hubble in 2014. NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it Colorful view of universe as seen by…

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This is an artist's impression of the Jupiter-size extrasolar planet, HD 189733b, being eclipsed by its parent star. Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have measured carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the planet's atmosphere. The planet is a "hot Jupiter," which is so close to its star that it completes an orbit in only 2.2 days. The planet is too hot for life as we know it. But under the right conditions, on a more Earth-like world, carbon dioxide can indicate the presence of extraterrestrial life. This observation demonstrates that chemical biotracers can be detected by space telescope observations. Credits: ESA, NASA, M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble), and STScI

NASA’s Webb Space Telescope to Inspect Atmospheres of Gas Giant Exoplanets

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Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement…

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An artist’s impression of interstellar object `Oumuamua, assuming it’s a rock. ESO/M. Kornmesser, CC BY

Comet or asteroid? Mysterious ‘Oumuamua shows why we may need a new classification system

Comet or asteroid? Mysterious ‘Oumuamua shows why we may need a new classification system Artist’s impression of the interstellar object. ESO/M. Kornmesser, CC BY Monica…

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This photo of Jupiter, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, was snapped when the planet was comparatively close to Earth, at a distance of 415 million miles. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (NASA Goddard)

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to Target Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to Target Jupiter’s Great Red Spot NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, the most ambitious and complex space observatory ever built,…

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Artist's illustration and X-ray image of "red nugget" galaxy Mrk 1216. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MTA-Eötvös University/N. Werner et al., Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers About a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called “red nuggets.” A new…

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Mission specialist Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly in space. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering

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A ripple of bright blue threads through this galaxy like a misshapen lake system. The foreground of this image is littered with nearby stars with their gleaming diffraction spikes. A keen eye can also spot a few other galaxies that, while masquerading as stars at first glance, reveal their true nature on closer inspection. The central galaxy streaked with colour, IC 4870, was discovered by DeLisle Stewart in 1900 and is located approximately 28 million light-years away. It contains an active galactic nucleus, or AGN: an extremely luminous central region so alight with radiation that it can outshine the rest of the galaxy put together. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble Images a Galaxy with Threads of Blue

Hubble Images a Galaxy with Threads of Blue A ripple of bright blue gas threads through this galaxy like a misshapen lake system. The foreground…

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Analysis of asteroids like Lutetia was used in the Josef Hanuš-led paper on asteroid thermophysical modeling. Lutetia is a large main belt asteroid about 62 miles (100 kilometers) in diameter. Lutetia was visited by ESA's Rosetta spacecraft in 2010. Credits: ESA 2010 MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/RSSD/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

NEOWISE Thermal Data Reveal Surface Properties of Over 100 Asteroids

NEOWISE Thermal Data Reveal Surface Properties of Over 100 Asteroids Nearly all asteroids are so far away and so small that the astronomical community only…

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This image, taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), both installed on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the peculiar galaxy NGC 3256. The galaxy is about 100 million light-years from Earth and is the result of a past galactic merger, which created its distorted appearance. As such, NGC 3256 provides an ideal target to investigate starbursts that have been triggered by galaxy mergers. Another image of NGC 3256 was already released in 2008, as part of a collection of interacting galaxies, created for Hubble’s 18th birthday. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness Though it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site…

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A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

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