This artist’s impression shows a dusty galaxy in the distant Universe that is forming stars at a rate much higher than in our Milky Way. New ALMA observations have allowed scientists to lift the veil of dust and see what was previously inaccessible — that such starburst  galaxies have an excess of massive stars as compared to more peaceful galaxies. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far

ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far Astronomers using ALMA and the VLT have discovered that both starburst…

View More ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far

This illustration shows the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe observing signals from the interaction of the solar wind with the winds of other stars. Credits: NASA

NASA Selects Mission to Study Solar Wind Boundary of Outer Solar System

NASA Selects Mission to Study Solar Wind Boundary of Outer Solar System NASA has selected a science mission planned for launch in 2024 that will…

View More NASA Selects Mission to Study Solar Wind Boundary of Outer Solar System

Glowing brightly about 160 000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way. This image from VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile shows the region and its rich surroundings in great detail. It reveals a cosmic landscape of star clusters, glowing gas clouds and the scattered remains of supernova explosions. Credit: ESO

A Crowded Neighbourhood

A Crowded Neighbourhood Glowing brightly about 160 000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite…

View More A Crowded Neighbourhood

A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

View More Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch?

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch? About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai…

View More Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch?

At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in space; they swarm together, gathered up by the unyielding hand of gravity, to form groups and clusters. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, which is part of the Virgo Cluster, which in turn is part of the 100 000-galaxy-strong Laniakea Supercluster. The galaxy cluster seen in this image is known as SDSS J0333+0651. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the…

View More Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

These six images represent the variety of star-forming regions in nearby galaxies. The galaxies are part of the Hubble Space Telescope's Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe. The six images consist of two dwarf galaxies (UGC 5340 and UGCA 281) and four large spiral galaxies (NGC 3368, NGC 3627, NGC 6744, and NGC 4258). The images are a blend of ultraviolet light and visible light from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credits: NASA/ESA/LEGUS team

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies Capitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, an international team…

View More Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

Image credit: NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al.

Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center

Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center Astronomers have discovered evidence for thousands of black holes located near the center of our Milky…

View More Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center

Gaia’s view of our Milky Way and neighbouring galaxies. ESA/Gaia/DPAC, CC BY-SA

Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us

Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us Gaia’s view of our Milky Way and neighbouring…

View More Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us

The Sombrero galaxy reveals the extremes of age and shape. NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

From pancakes to soccer balls, new study shows how galaxies change shape as they age

From pancakes to soccer balls, new study shows how galaxies change shape as they age The Sombrero galaxy reveals the extremes of age and shape.…

View More From pancakes to soccer balls, new study shows how galaxies change shape as they age

These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble’s 28th anniversary in space. Credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast…

View More Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery

New images from the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope are revealing the dusty discs surrounding nearby young stars in greater detail than previously achieved. They show a bizarre variety of shapes, sizes and structures, including the likely effects of planets still in the process of forming. Credit: ESO/H. Avenhaus et al./E. Sissa et al./DARTT-S and SHINE collaborations

SPHERE Reveals Fascinating Zoo of Discs Around Young Stars

SPHERE Reveals Fascinating Zoo of Discs Around Young Stars New images from the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope are revealing the dusty discs…

View More SPHERE Reveals Fascinating Zoo of Discs Around Young Stars

The Milky Way, our own galaxy, stretches across the sky above the La Silla telescope in Chile. Hidden inside our own galaxy are trillions of planets, most waiting to be found. Credits: ESO/S. Brunier

What in the World is an ‘Exoplanet?’

What in the World is an ‘Exoplanet?’ Step outside on a clear night, and you can be sure of something our ancestors could only imagine:…

View More What in the World is an ‘Exoplanet?’

This new picture created from images from telescopes on the ground and in space tells the story of the hunt for an elusive missing object hidden amid a complex tangle of gaseous filaments in one of our nearest neighbouring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The reddish background image comes from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and reveals the wisps of gas forming the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in green. The red ring with a dark centre is from the MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope and the blue and purple images are from the NASA Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The blue spot at the centre of the red ring is an isolated neutron star with a weak magnetic field, the first identified outside the Milky Way. Credit: ESO/NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)/F. Vogt et al.

Dead Star Circled by Light

Dead Star Circled by Light New images from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other telescopes reveal a rich landscape of stars and glowing…

View More Dead Star Circled by Light