The COSMOS Legacy Survey shows data that have provided evidence for the existence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/ICE/M.Mezcua et al.; Infrared: NASA/JPL-Caltech; Illustration: NASA/CXC/A.Hobart

Finding the Happy Medium of Black Holes

Finding the Happy Medium of Black Holes Scientists have taken major steps in their hunt to find black holes that are neither very small nor…

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Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of the supernova remnant HBH3 in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The puffy, white feature in the image is a portion of the star forming regions W3, W4 and W5. Infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns have been mapped to blue, and 4.5 microns to red. The white color of the star-forming region is a combination of both wavelengths, while the HBH3 filaments radiate only at the longer 4.5 micron wavelength. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPAC

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of one of the larger supernova remnants in the…

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The motion of the S2 star passing through the extreme gravitational field near the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. European Southern Observatory

Why starlight turns red escaping from black hole at heart of Milky Way

Why starlight turns red escaping from black hole at heart of Milky Way eso a CROP. Indranil Banik, University of St Andrews For the past…

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An artist’s impression of the path of star S2 as it passes very close to the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way. The very strong gravitational field causes the colour of the star to shift slightly to the red. (Size and colour exaggerated for clarity.) ESO/M. Kornmesser, CC BY

Einstein’s theory of gravity tested by a star speeding past a supermassive black hole

Einstein’s theory of gravity tested by a star speeding past a supermassive black hole An artist’s impression of the path of star S2 as it…

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Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement…

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This artist’s impression shows a dusty galaxy in the distant Universe that is forming stars at a rate much higher than in our Milky Way. New ALMA observations have allowed scientists to lift the veil of dust and see what was previously inaccessible — that such starburst  galaxies have an excess of massive stars as compared to more peaceful galaxies. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far

ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far Astronomers using ALMA and the VLT have discovered that both starburst…

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This illustration shows the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe observing signals from the interaction of the solar wind with the winds of other stars. Credits: NASA

NASA Selects Mission to Study Solar Wind Boundary of Outer Solar System

NASA Selects Mission to Study Solar Wind Boundary of Outer Solar System NASA has selected a science mission planned for launch in 2024 that will…

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Glowing brightly about 160 000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way. This image from VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile shows the region and its rich surroundings in great detail. It reveals a cosmic landscape of star clusters, glowing gas clouds and the scattered remains of supernova explosions. Credit: ESO

A Crowded Neighbourhood

A Crowded Neighbourhood Glowing brightly about 160 000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite…

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A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

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About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch?

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch? About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai…

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At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in space; they swarm together, gathered up by the unyielding hand of gravity, to form groups and clusters. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, which is part of the Virgo Cluster, which in turn is part of the 100 000-galaxy-strong Laniakea Supercluster. The galaxy cluster seen in this image is known as SDSS J0333+0651. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the…

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These six images represent the variety of star-forming regions in nearby galaxies. The galaxies are part of the Hubble Space Telescope's Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe. The six images consist of two dwarf galaxies (UGC 5340 and UGCA 281) and four large spiral galaxies (NGC 3368, NGC 3627, NGC 6744, and NGC 4258). The images are a blend of ultraviolet light and visible light from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credits: NASA/ESA/LEGUS team

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies Capitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, an international team…

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