These simulated views of the ultrahot Jupiter WASP-121b show what the planet might look like to the human eye from five different vantage points, illuminated to different degrees by its parent star. The images were created using a computer simulation being used to help scientists understand the atmospheres of these ultra-hot planets. Ultrahot Jupiters reflect almost no light, rather like charcoal. However, the daysides of ultrahot Jupiters have temperatures of between 3600°F and 5400°F (2000°C and 3000°C), so the planets produce their own glow, like a hot ember. The orange color in this simulated image is thus from the planet's own heat. The computer model was based on observations of WASP-121b conducted using NASA's Spitzer and Hubble space telescopes. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Vivien Parmentier/Aix-Marseille University (AMU)

Water Is Destroyed, Then Reborn in Ultrahot Jupiters

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A composite image of Olympus Mons on Mars, the tallest known volcano and mountain in the Solar System. Author: NASA

I’ve Always Wondered: Why are the volcanoes on Earth active, but the ones on Mars are not?

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Illustration of Pioneer Venus Multiprobe approaching Venus. Image credit: NASA/ Paul Hudson

40 Years Ago, Pioneer Venus Multiprobe Launched to Study the Cloud-Shrouded Planet Venus

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This spectacular image from the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope is the first clear image of a planet caught in the very act of formation around the dwarf star PDS 70. The planet stands clearly out, visible as a bright point to the right of the centre of the image, which is blacked out by the coronagraph mask used to block the blinding light of the central star. Credit: ESO/A. Müller et al.

First Confirmed Image of Newborn Planet Caught with ESO’s VLT

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This artist’s illustration depicts the destruction of a young planet or planets, which scientists may have witnessed for the first time using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Credits: Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss; X-ray spectrum: NASA/CXC/MIT/H. M.Günther

Chandra May Have First Evidence of a Young Star Devouring a Planet

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This is an artist's impression of the Jupiter-size extrasolar planet, HD 189733b, being eclipsed by its parent star. Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have measured carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide in the planet's atmosphere. The planet is a "hot Jupiter," which is so close to its star that it completes an orbit in only 2.2 days. The planet is too hot for life as we know it. But under the right conditions, on a more Earth-like world, carbon dioxide can indicate the presence of extraterrestrial life. This observation demonstrates that chemical biotracers can be detected by space telescope observations. Credits: ESA, NASA, M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble), and STScI

NASA’s Webb Space Telescope to Inspect Atmospheres of Gas Giant Exoplanets

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The Blood Moon from January 31, 2018. Our second chance to see an eclipsed Moon this year is coming up on July 28. Martin George, Author provided

It’s a busy night sky this July, so make sure you look up

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Artist’s rendering of a Mars artificial gravity transfer vehicle. NASA

Method of making oxygen from water in zero gravity raises hope for long-distance space travel

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This photograph was taken in Wallonia, Belgium. J.S. Henrardi

Are we alone? The question is worthy of serious scientific study

Are we alone? The question is worthy of serious scientific study US F/A-18 footage of a UFO (circled in red). Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0…

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This photo of Jupiter, taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, was snapped when the planet was comparatively close to Earth, at a distance of 415 million miles. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (NASA Goddard)

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope to Target Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

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What a difference 40 years makes. An enhanced color image of Charon from data gathered by the New Horizons spacecraft in 2015 shows a range of diverse surface features, significantly transforming our view of a moon discovered in 1978 as a “bump” on Pluto (inset) in a set of grainy telescope images. Credits: U.S. Naval Observatory; NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

Charon at 40: Four Decades of Discovery on Pluto’s Largest Moon

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NASA astronaut Alexander Gerst learns how to use a sextant. “I learned how to navigate after the stars using a sextant,” said Gerst. “It’s actually a test for a backup nav method for #Orion & future deep space missions.” Credits: NASA

Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device

Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device A tool that has helped guide sailors across oceans for centuries is now being tested aboard…

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