Space Breaking News:

Arctic sea ice likely reached its 2018 lowest extent on Sept. 19 and again on Sept. 23, according to NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Credit: NASA Goddard/ Katy Mersmann

2018 Arctic Summertime Sea Ice Minimum Extent Tied for Sixth Lowest on Record

2018 Arctic Summertime Sea Ice Minimum Extent Tied for Sixth Lowest on Record Arctic sea ice likely reached its 2018 lowest extent on Sept. 19 and again on Sept. 23, according to NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. Analysis…

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U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence speaks about the creation of a United States Space Force on Aug. 9, 2018 at the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How Canadian technology could protect Space Force troops

How Canadian technology could protect Space Force troops U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence speaks about the creation of a United States Space Force on Aug. 9, 2018 at the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) Fiona E. McNeill, McMaster University U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence has announced that the United States plans to establish…

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taken on July 25 by the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite. The angular extent of the widest field of view is six degrees. Visible in the images are the comet C/2018 N1, asteroids, variable stars, asteroids and reflected light from Mars. TESS is expected to find thousands of planets around other nearby stars. Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology/NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s Planet-Hunting TESS Catches a Comet Before Starting Science

NASA’s Planet-Hunting TESS Catches a Comet Before Starting Science Before NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) started science operations on July 25, 2018, the planet hunter sent back a stunning sequence of serendipitous images showing the motion of a comet. Taken over the course of 17 hours on July 25,…

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Wildfires, volcanoes and climate change: how satellites tell the story of our changing world

Wildfires, volcanoes and climate change: how satellites tell the story of our changing world Shutterstock Ian Whittaker, Nottingham Trent University The average rainfall for the first two weeks of July in England was 6mm, while only 15mm fell throughout all of June, according to the UK’s Environment Agency. To give…

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Houston we have a surfeit. 3Dsculptor

We’ll soon have ten times more satellites in orbit – here’s what that means

We’ll soon have ten times more satellites in orbit – here’s what that means Houston we have a surfeit. 3Dsculptor Christopher Newman, Northumbria University, Newcastle The Iridium-7 mission has successfully launched from the Vandenberg air force base in California, placing the latest ten satellites from the American company’s second-generation network…

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The Pacific Ocean teems with phytoplankton along the West Coast of the United States, as captured by the MODIS instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite. Satellites can track phytoplankton blooms, which occur when these plant-like organisms receive optimal amounts of sunlight and nutrients. Phytoplankton play an important role in removing atmospheric carbon dioxide. Credits: NASA

NASA, NSF Plunge Into Ocean ‘Twilight Zone’ to Explore Ecosystem Carbon Flow

NASA, NSF Plunge Into Ocean ‘Twilight Zone’ to Explore Ecosystem Carbon Flow A large multidisciplinary team of scientists, equipped with advanced underwater robotics and an array of analytical instrumentation, will set sail for the northeastern Pacific Ocean this August. The team’s mission for NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF)…

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GoogleEarth., Author provided

The eye in the sky that can spot illegal rubbish dumps from space

The eye in the sky that can spot illegal rubbish dumps from space GoogleEarth., Author provided Ray Purdy, University of Oxford More than 1,000 illegal waste sites spring up across England each year – and there are probably far more that haven’t been recorded. In 2016, the head of the…

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Crevasses near the grounding line of Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica. Credits: University of Washington/I. Joughin

Ramp-Up in Antarctic Ice Loss Speeds Sea Level Rise

Ramp-Up in Antarctic Ice Loss Speeds Sea Level Rise Ice losses from Antarctica have tripled since 2012, increasing global sea levels by 0.12 inch (3 millimeters) in that timeframe alone, according to a major new international climate assessment funded by NASA and ESA (European Space Agency). According to the study,…

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The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula. NASA/John Sonntag, CC BY

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate

Short-term changes in Antarctica’s ice shelves are key to predicting their long-term fate The northeast edge of the Venable Ice Shelf, near Antarctica’s Allison Peninsula. NASA/John Sonntag, CC BY Helen Amanda Fricker, University of California San Diego; Fernando Paolo, California Institute of Technology; Matthew Siegfried, Stanford University, and Susheel Adusumilli,…

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Antarctica has lost nearly 3 trillion tonnes of ice since 1992

Antarctica has lost nearly 3 trillion tonnes of ice since 1992 Christian Wilkinson / shutterstock Thomas Slater, University of Leeds and Andrew Shepherd, University of Leeds It can be easy to overlook the monstrous scale of the Antarctic ice sheet. Ice, thick enough in many places to bury mountains, covers…

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Artist's rendering of the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, scheduled to launch in May, 2018. GRACE-FO will track the evolution of Earth's water cycle by monitoring changes in the distribution of mass on Earth. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

GRACE-FO Turns on ‘Range Finder,’ Sees Mountain Effects

GRACE-FO Turns on ‘Range Finder,’ Sees Mountain Effects Recently Launched Twin Satellites Create ‘The Himalaya Plot’ Less than three weeks after launch, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission has successfully completed its first mission phase and demonstrated the performance of the precise microwave ranging system that enables…

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An illustration of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which has now been studying the extreme universe for a decade. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries On June 11, NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope celebrates a decade of using gamma rays, the highest-energy form of light in the cosmos, to study black holes, neutron stars, and other extreme cosmic objects and events. “Fermi’s first 10 years have produced numerous scientific…

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View two decades of planetary change through imagery like this one at NASA's Worldview. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

20 Years of Earth Data Now at Your Fingertips

20 Years of Earth Data Now at Your Fingertips Powerful Earth-observing instruments aboard NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites, launched in 1999 and 2002, respectively, have observed nearly two decades of planetary change. Now, for the first time, all that imagery — from the first operational image to imagery acquired today…

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An artist's concept of one of NASA's MarCO CubeSats. The twin MarCOs are the first CubeSats to complete a trajectory correction maneuver, firing their thrusters to guide themselves toward Mars. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA CubeSats Steer Toward Mars

NASA CubeSats Steer Toward Mars NASA has achieved a first for the class of tiny spacecraft known as CubeSats, which are opening new access to space. Over the past week, two CubeSats called MarCO-A and MarCO-B have been firing their propulsion systems to guide themselves toward Mars. This process, called…

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