New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during testing of the HAWK-I camera with the GRAAL adaptive optics system. It shows the cluster and its surrounding clouds of brightly glowing gas in exquisite detail, with dark tendrils of dust threading through the bright core of this young gathering of stars. Credit: ESO/K. Muzic

Colourful Celestial Landscape

Colourful Celestial Landscape New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope show the star cluster RCW 38 in all its glory. This image was taken during…

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This spectacular image from the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope is the first clear image of a planet caught in the very act of formation around the dwarf star PDS 70. The planet stands clearly out, visible as a bright point to the right of the centre of the image, which is blacked out by the coronagraph mask used to block the blinding light of the central star. Credit: ESO/A. Müller et al.

First Confirmed Image of Newborn Planet Caught with ESO’s VLT

First Confirmed Image of Newborn Planet Caught with ESO’s VLT SPHERE, a planet-hunting instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope, has captured the first confirmed image…

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Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of the supernova remnant HBH3 in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The puffy, white feature in the image is a portion of the star forming regions W3, W4 and W5. Infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns have been mapped to blue, and 4.5 microns to red. The white color of the star-forming region is a combination of both wavelengths, while the HBH3 filaments radiate only at the longer 4.5 micron wavelength. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPAC

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of one of the larger supernova remnants in the…

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The motion of the S2 star passing through the extreme gravitational field near the supermassive black hole in the centre of the Milky Way. European Southern Observatory

Why starlight turns red escaping from black hole at heart of Milky Way

Why starlight turns red escaping from black hole at heart of Milky Way eso a CROP. Indranil Banik, University of St Andrews For the past…

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This artist’s illustration depicts the destruction of a young planet or planets, which scientists may have witnessed for the first time using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Credits: Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss; X-ray spectrum: NASA/CXC/MIT/H. M.Günther

Chandra May Have First Evidence of a Young Star Devouring a Planet

Chandra May Have First Evidence of a Young Star Devouring a Planet Scientists may have observed, for the first time, the destruction of a young…

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Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement…

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Triple star system involving a pulsar suggests Einstein was right. Kevin Gill/Flickr, CC BY-ND

Free-falling dead stars show that a cornerstone of physics holds up

Free-falling dead stars show that a cornerstone of physics holds up Triple star system involving a pulsar suggests Einstein was right. Kevin Gill/Flickr, CC BY-ND…

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What could a ‘relativistic camera’ capture on the way to Alpha Centauri? ESA/NASA, CC BY

Observing the universe with a camera traveling near the speed of light

Observing the universe with a camera traveling near the speed of light What could a ‘relativistic camera’ capture on the way to Alpha Centauri? ESA/NASA,…

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Artist's illustration and X-ray image of "red nugget" galaxy Mrk 1216. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MTA-Eötvös University/N. Werner et al., Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers About a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called “red nuggets.” A new…

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When galaxies align. NASA

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter When galaxies align. NASA Thomas Collett,…

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NASA astronaut Alexander Gerst learns how to use a sextant. “I learned how to navigate after the stars using a sextant,” said Gerst. “It’s actually a test for a backup nav method for #Orion & future deep space missions.” Credits: NASA

Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device

Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device A tool that has helped guide sailors across oceans for centuries is now being tested aboard…

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Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF., Author provided

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star…

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An image of the galaxy Arp299B, which is undergoing a merging process with Arp299A (the galaxy to the left), captured by NASA's Hubble space telescope. The inset features an artist's illustration of a tidal disruption event (TDE), which occurs when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. A TDE was recently observed near the center of Arp299B. Credits: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA, STScI

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star For the first time, astronomers have directly imaged the formation and expansion of a fast-moving jet…

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