Colorful view of universe as seen by Hubble in 2014. NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it Colorful view of universe as seen by…

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This artist’s illustration depicts the destruction of a young planet or planets, which scientists may have witnessed for the first time using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Credits: Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss; X-ray spectrum: NASA/CXC/MIT/H. M.Günther

Chandra May Have First Evidence of a Young Star Devouring a Planet

Chandra May Have First Evidence of a Young Star Devouring a Planet Scientists may have observed, for the first time, the destruction of a young…

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Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement…

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This photograph was taken in Wallonia, Belgium. J.S. Henrardi

Are we alone? The question is worthy of serious scientific study

Are we alone? The question is worthy of serious scientific study US F/A-18 footage of a UFO (circled in red). Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0…

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Blast off. Sergey Nivens

Eight ethical questions about exploring outer space that need answers

Eight ethical questions about exploring outer space that need answers Blast off. Sergey Nivens Benjamin Sachs, University of St Andrews Metallic shrapnel flying faster than…

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Artist's illustration and X-ray image of "red nugget" galaxy Mrk 1216. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MTA-Eötvös University/N. Werner et al., Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers About a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called “red nuggets.” A new…

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When galaxies align. NASA

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter When galaxies align. NASA Thomas Collett,…

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Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF., Author provided

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star…

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An image of the galaxy Arp299B, which is undergoing a merging process with Arp299A (the galaxy to the left), captured by NASA's Hubble space telescope. The inset features an artist's illustration of a tidal disruption event (TDE), which occurs when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. A TDE was recently observed near the center of Arp299B. Credits: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA, STScI

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star

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An illustration of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which has now been studying the extreme universe for a decade. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries

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This artist’s impression shows a dusty galaxy in the distant Universe that is forming stars at a rate much higher than in our Milky Way. New ALMA observations have allowed scientists to lift the veil of dust and see what was previously inaccessible — that such starburst  galaxies have an excess of massive stars as compared to more peaceful galaxies. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far

ALMA and VLT Find Too Many Massive Stars in Starburst Galaxies, Near and Far Astronomers using ALMA and the VLT have discovered that both starburst…

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How unique is our universe? Jaime Salcido/Durham University, Author provided

We discovered that life may be billions of times more common in the multiverse

We discovered that life may be billions of times more common in the multiverse How unique is our universe? Jaime Salcido/Durham University, Author provided Richard…

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This image, taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), both installed on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the peculiar galaxy NGC 3256. The galaxy is about 100 million light-years from Earth and is the result of a past galactic merger, which created its distorted appearance. As such, NGC 3256 provides an ideal target to investigate starbursts that have been triggered by galaxy mergers. Another image of NGC 3256 was already released in 2008, as part of a collection of interacting galaxies, created for Hubble’s 18th birthday. Credit: ESA/Hubble, NASA

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness

Cosmic collision lights up the darkness Though it resembles a peaceful rose swirling in the darkness of the cosmos, NGC 3256 is actually the site…

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