A new study involving long-term monitoring of Alpha Centauri by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory indicates that any planets orbiting the two brightest stars are likely not being pummeled by large amounts of X-ray radiation from their host stars. This is important for the viability of life in the nearest star system outside the Solar System. Chandra data from May 2nd, 2017 are seen in the pull-out, which is shown in context of a visible-light image taken from the ground of the Alpha Centauri system and its surroundings. Alpha Centauri is a triple star system located just over four light years, or about 25 trillion miles, from Earth. While this is a large distance in terrestrial terms, it is three times closer than the next nearest Sun-like star. Credits: Optical: Zdenek Bardon; X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Colorado/T. Ayres et al.

Chandra Scouts Nearest Star System for Possible Hazards

Chandra Scouts Nearest Star System for Possible Hazards In humanity’s search for life outside our Solar System, one of the best places scientists have considered…

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A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

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Image credit: NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al.

Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center

Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center Astronomers have discovered evidence for thousands of black holes located near the center of our Milky…

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This new picture created from images from telescopes on the ground and in space tells the story of the hunt for an elusive missing object hidden amid a complex tangle of gaseous filaments in one of our nearest neighbouring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The reddish background image comes from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and reveals the wisps of gas forming the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in green. The red ring with a dark centre is from the MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope and the blue and purple images are from the NASA Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The blue spot at the centre of the red ring is an isolated neutron star with a weak magnetic field, the first identified outside the Milky Way. Credit: ESO/NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)/F. Vogt et al.

Dead Star Circled by Light

Dead Star Circled by Light New images from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other telescopes reveal a rich landscape of stars and glowing…

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A gigantic and resilient “cold front” hurtling through the Perseus galaxy cluster has been studied using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Credits: NASA/CXC/GSFC/S. Walker, ESA/XMM, ROSAT

Scientists Surprised by Relentless Cosmic Cold Front

Scientists Surprised by Relentless Cosmic Cold Front This winter has brought many intense and powerful storms, with cold fronts sweeping across much of the United…

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In this graphic an image from the Chandra Deep Field-South is shown. The Chandra image (blue) is the deepest ever obtained in X-rays. It has been combined with an optical and infrared image from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), colored red, green, and blue. Each Chandra source is produced by hot gas falling towards a supermassive black hole in the center of the host galaxy, as depicted in the artist’s illustration. Credits: NASA/CXC/Penn. State/G. Yang et al and NASA/CXC/ICE/M. Mezcua et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI; Illustration: NASA/CXC/A. Jubett

Supermassive Black Holes Are Outgrowing Their Galaxies

Supermassive Black Holes Are Outgrowing Their Galaxies The biggest black holes in the Universe are growing faster than the rate of stars being formed in…

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A visualization of the center of our galaxy. Credits: NASA/CXC/Pontifical Catholic Univ. of Chile /C.Russell et al.

Scientists Take Viewers to the Center of the Milky Way

Scientists Take Viewers to the Center of the Milky Way CORRECTION (Earth’s distance from the Milky Way’s center was erroneously reported. 150,000 trillion miles is…

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Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NRAO/D.-C.Kim; Optical: NASA/STScI; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

Astronomers Pursue Renegade Supermassive Black Hole

Astronomers Pursue Renegade Supermassive Black Hole Supermassive holes are generally stationary objects, sitting at the centers of most galaxies. However, using data from NASA’s Chandra…

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Artist's illustration of a star found in the closest orbit known around a black hole in the globular cluster named 47 Tucanae. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

Star Discovered in Closest Known Orbit Around Likely Black Hole

Star Discovered in Closest Known Orbit Around Likely Black Hole Astronomers have found evidence for a star that whips around a black hole about twice…

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The distorted galaxy in the simulation results from a collision between two galaxies, followed by them merging. Astronomers think such a merger could be the reason why SPT0346-52 is having such a boom of stellar construction. Once the two galaxies collide, gas near the center of the merged galaxy (shown as the bright region in the center of the simulation) is compressed, producing a burst of new stars. The composite inset shows X-ray data from Chandra (blue), short wavelength infrared data from Hubble (green), infrared light from Spitzer (red) at longer wavelengths, and infrared data from ALMA (magenta) at even longer wavelengths. (The light from SPT0346-52 is distorted and magnified by the gravity of an intervening galaxy, producing three elongated images in the ALMA data located near the center of the image. SPT0346-52 is not visible in the Hubble or Spitzer data, but the intervening galaxy causing the gravitational lensing is detected.) There is no blue at the center of the image, showing that Chandra did not detect any X-rays that could have signaled the presence of a growing black hole. Credit: Image courtesy of CXC Press Office.

‘Hyper-starburst’ galaxy churns out stars, clues to universe’s evolution

‘Hyper-starburst’ galaxy churns out stars, clues to universe’s evolution A recently discovered galaxy is undergoing an extraordinary boom of stellar construction, revealed by a group…

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