Space Breaking News:

HIRAX prototype dishes at Hartebeesthoek Astronomy Observatory near Johannesburg. Kabelo Kesebonye

New telescope chases the mysteries of radio flashes and dark energy

New telescope chases the mysteries of radio flashes and dark energy HIRAX prototype dishes at Hartebeesthoek Astronomy Observatory near Johannesburg. Kabelo Kesebonye  Kavilan Moodley, University of KwaZulu-Natal South Africa is becoming one of the world’s most important radio astronomy hubs, thanks in large part to its role as co-host of…

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Galaxy history revealed by the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA

What is nothing? Martin Rees Q&A

What is nothing? Martin Rees Q&A Galaxy history revealed by the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA Martin Rees, University of Cambridge Philosophers have debated the nature of “nothing” for thousands of years, but what has modern science got to say about it? In an interview with The Conversation, Martin Rees, Astronomer…

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Colorful view of universe as seen by Hubble in 2014. NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI)

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it Colorful view of universe as seen by Hubble in 2014. NASA, ESA, H. Teplitz and M. Rafelski (IPAC/Caltech), A. Koekemoer (STScI), R. Windhorst (Arizona State University), and Z. Levay (STScI) Thomas Kitching,…

View More The universe’s rate of expansion is in dispute – and we may need new physics to solve it

Using two of the world’s most powerful space telescopes — NASA’s Hubble and ESA’s Gaia — astronomers have made the most precise measurements to date of the universe’s expansion rate. This is calculated by gauging the distances between nearby galaxies using special types of stars called Cepheid variables as cosmic yardsticks. By comparing their intrinsic brightness as measured by Hubble, with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances. Gaia further refines this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distances to Cepheid variables within our Milky Way galaxy. This allowed astronomers to more precisely calibrate the distances to Cepheids that are seen in outside galaxies. Credits: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum

Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the universe’s expansion rate. The results further fuel the mismatch between measurements for the expansion rate of the nearby universe, and those…

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When galaxies align. NASA

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter When galaxies align. NASA Thomas Collett, University of Portsmouth Gravity may be the weakest of the fundamental forces in nature, but it is ultimately what enabled life on Earth to evolve.…

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How unique is our universe? Jaime Salcido/Durham University, Author provided

We discovered that life may be billions of times more common in the multiverse

We discovered that life may be billions of times more common in the multiverse How unique is our universe? Jaime Salcido/Durham University, Author provided Richard Bower, Durham University Why is there life in our universe? The existence of galaxies, stars, planets and ultimately life seem to depend on a small…

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About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch?

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch? About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA Tamara Davis, The University of Queensland This is an article from Curious Kids, a series for children. The Conversation is…

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Gaia’s view of our Milky Way and neighbouring galaxies. ESA/Gaia/DPAC, CC BY-SA

Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us

Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us Gaia’s view of our Milky Way and neighbouring galaxies. ESA/Gaia/DPAC, CC BY-SA  George Seabroke, UCL Most of us have looked up at the night sky and wondered how far away the stars are…

View More Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us

This large, fuzzy-looking galaxy is so diffuse that astronomers call it a “see-through” galaxy because they can clearly see distant galaxies behind it. The ghostly object, catalogued as NGC 1052-DF2, doesn’t have a noticeable central region, or even spiral arms and a disk, typical features of a spiral galaxy. But it doesn’t look like an elliptical galaxy, either. Even its globular clusters are oddballs: they are twice as large as typical stellar groupings seen in other galaxies. All of these oddities pale in comparison to the weirdest aspect of this galaxy: NGC 1052-DF2 is missing most, if not all, of its dark matter. Credits: NASA, ESA, and P. van Dokkum (Yale University)

Dark Matter Goes Missing in Oddball Galaxy

Dark Matter Goes Missing in Oddball Galaxy Galaxies and dark matter go together like peanut butter and jelly. You typically don’t find one without the other. Therefore, researchers were surprised when they uncovered a galaxy that is missing most, if not all, of its dark matter. An invisible substance, dark…

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These Hubble Space Telescope images showcase two of the 19 galaxies analyzed in a project to improve the precision of the universe's expansion rate, a value known as the Hubble constant. The color-composite images show NGC 3972 (left) and NGC 1015 (right), located 65 million light-years and 118 million light-years, respectively, from Earth. The yellow circles in each galaxy represent the locations of pulsating stars called Cepheid variables. Credits: NASA, ESA, A. Riess (STScI/JHU)

Improved Hubble Yardstick Gives Fresh Evidence for New Physics in the Universe

Improved Hubble Yardstick Gives Fresh Evidence for New Physics in the Universe Astronomers have used NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to make the most precise measurements of the expansion rate of the universe since it was first calculated nearly a century ago. Intriguingly, the results are forcing astronomers to consider that…

View More Improved Hubble Yardstick Gives Fresh Evidence for New Physics in the Universe

In 2014, astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope found that this enormous galaxy cluster contains the mass of a staggering three million billion Suns. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS

Hubble Weighs in on Mass of Three Million Billion Suns

Hubble Weighs in on Mass of Three Million Billion Suns In 2014, astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope found that this enormous galaxy cluster contains the mass of a staggering three million billion suns — so it’s little wonder that it has earned the nickname of “El Gordo” (“the…

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Artist s impression of merging neutron stars. Author University of Warwick/Mark Garlick, CC BY-SA

How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what ‘dark energy’ is

How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what ‘dark energy’ is Artist s impression of merging neutron stars. Author University of Warwick/Mark Garlick, CC BY-SA Thomas Kitching, UCL There was much excitement when scientists witnessed the violent collision of two ultra-dense, massive stars more than…

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Image showing where scientists believe dark matter resides in the galaxy cluster Abell 520 – near the hot gas in the middle, coloured green. Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, CC BY-SA

Study finds ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’ may not exist – here’s what to make of it

Study finds ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’ may not exist – here’s what to make of it Image showing where scientists believe dark matter resides in the galaxy cluster Abell 520 – near the hot gas in the middle, coloured green. Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, CC BY-SA Kevin Pimbblet, University…

View More Study finds ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’ may not exist – here’s what to make of it

Part of the new map of dark matter made from gravitational lensing measurements of 26 million galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey. Chihway Chang/University of Chicago/DES collaboration, Author provided

What a new map of the universe tells us about dark matter

What a new map of the universe tells us about dark matter Part of the new map of dark matter made from gravitational lensing measurements of 26 million galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey. Chihway Chang/University of Chicago/DES collaboration, Author provided Tamara Davis, The University of Queensland The most precise…

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