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Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of the supernova remnant HBH3 in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The puffy, white feature in the image is a portion of the star forming regions W3, W4 and W5. Infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns have been mapped to blue, and 4.5 microns to red. The white color of the star-forming region is a combination of both wavelengths, while the HBH3 filaments radiate only at the longer 4.5 micron wavelength. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPAC

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of one of the larger supernova remnants in the Milky Way galaxy in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. A supernova “remnant” refers to the collective, leftover signs of an exploded star, or…

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An illustration of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which has now been studying the extreme universe for a decade. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries On June 11, NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope celebrates a decade of using gamma rays, the highest-energy form of light in the cosmos, to study black holes, neutron stars, and other extreme cosmic objects and events. “Fermi’s first 10 years have produced numerous scientific…

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Black-hole-powered galaxies called blazars are the most common sources detected by NASA's Fermi. As matter falls toward the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center, some of it is accelerated outward at nearly the speed of light along jets pointed in opposite directions. When one of the jets happens to be aimed in the direction of Earth, as illustrated here, the galaxy appears especially bright and is classified as a blazar. Credits: M. Weiss/CfA

NASA’s Fermi Discovers the Most Extreme Blazars Yet

NASA’s Fermi Discovers the Most Extreme Blazars Yet NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has identified the farthest gamma-ray blazars, a type of galaxy whose intense emissions are powered by supersized black holes. Light from the most distant object began its journey to us when the universe was 1.4 billion years…

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A gamma-ray pulsar is a compact neutron star that accelerates charged particles to relativistic speeds in its extremely strong magnetic field. This process produces gamma radiation (violet) far above the surface of the compact remains of the star, for example, while radio waves (green) are emitted over the magnetic poles in the form of a cone. The rotation moves the emission regions across the terrestrial line of sight, making the pulsar light up periodically in the sky. Credit: © NASA/Fermi/Cruz de Wilde

Distributed computing project [email protected] discovers 13 new gamma-ray pulsars

Distributed computing project [email protected] discovers 13 new gamma-ray pulsars An analysis that would have taken more than a thousand years on a single computer has found within one year more than a dozen new rapidly rotating neutron stars in data from the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. With computing power donated…

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Black-hole-powered galaxies called blazars are the most common sources detected by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. As matter falls toward the supermassive black hole at the galaxy's center, some of it is accelerated outward at nearly the speed of light along jets pointed in opposite directions. When one of the jets happens to be aimed in the direction of Earth, as illustrated here, the galaxy appears especially bright and is classified as a blazar. Credits: M. Weiss/CfA

NASA’s WISE, Fermi Missions Reveal a Surprising Blazar Connection

NASA’s WISE, Fermi Missions Reveal a Surprising Blazar Connection Astronomers studying distant galaxies powered by monster black holes have uncovered an unexpected link between two very different wavelengths of the light they emit, the mid-infrared and gamma rays. The discovery, which was accomplished by comparing data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey…

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