This cartoon shows how gas falling into distant starburst galaxies ends up in vast turbulent reservoirs of cool gas extending 30 000 light-years from the central regions. ALMA has been used to detect these turbulent reservoirs of cold gas surrounding similar distant starburst galaxies. By detecting CH+ for the first time in the distant Universe, this research opens up a new window of exploration into a critical epoch of star formation. Credit: ESO/L. Benassi

ALMA Finds Huge Hidden Reservoirs of Turbulent Gas in Distant Galaxies

ALMA Finds Huge Hidden Reservoirs of Turbulent Gas in Distant Galaxies A team led by Edith Falgarone (Ecole Normale Supérieure and Observatoire de Paris, France)…

View More ALMA Finds Huge Hidden Reservoirs of Turbulent Gas in Distant Galaxies

In this composite image combining GBT radio and WISE infrared observations, the filament of ammonia molecules appears red and Orion Nebula gas appears blue. Image: R. Friesen, Dunlap Institute; J. Pineda, MPE; GBO/AUI/NSF

Radio Astronomers Peer Deep into the Stellar Nursery of the Orion Nebula

Radio Astronomers Peer Deep into the Stellar Nursery of the Orion Nebula Astronomers have released an image of a vast filament of star-forming gas, 1200…

View More Radio Astronomers Peer Deep into the Stellar Nursery of the Orion Nebula

This artist’s concept depicts the early Martian environment (right) – believed to contain liquid water and a thicker atmosphere – versus the cold, dry environment seen at Mars today (left). NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution is in orbit of the Red Planet to study its upper atmosphere, ionosphere and interactions with the sun and solar wind. Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s MAVEN Reveals Most of Mars’ Atmosphere Was Lost to Space

NASA’s MAVEN Reveals Most of Mars’ Atmosphere Was Lost to Space Solar wind and radiation are responsible for stripping the Martian atmosphere, transforming Mars from…

View More NASA’s MAVEN Reveals Most of Mars’ Atmosphere Was Lost to Space

SEAS researchers suggest that early Mars may have been warmed intermittently by a powerful greenhouse effect, possibly explaining water on the planet's surface billions of years ago. Credit: NASA

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars

Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars Findings may help in search for life in the universe By Leah Burrows | January 24, 2017…

View More Bursts of methane may have warmed early Mars