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Galaxy Clusters Abell S1063 and MACS J0416.1-2403 Release Date: Dec 20, 2018 Credits: NASA, ESA, and M. Montes (University of New South Wales)

Galaxy Clusters Abell S1063 and MACS J0416.1-2403

Galaxy Clusters Abell S1063 and MACS J0416.1-2403 Two massive galaxy clusters — Abell S1063 (left) and MACS J0416.1-2403 (right) — display a soft blue haze, called intracluster light, embedded among innumerable galaxies. The intracluster light is produced by orphan stars that no longer belong to any single galaxy, having been…

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This image shows a massive galaxy cluster embedded in the middle of a field of nearly 8,000 galaxies scattered across space and time. This "galaxies galore" snapshot is from a new Hubble Space Telescope survey to boldly expand its view by significantly enlarging the area covered around huge galaxy clusters previously photographed by Hubble. In this view the huge cluster Abell 370, located about 4 billion light-years away, lies in the center of this image. It contains several hundred galaxies. The mosaic of fields flanking the cluster contains myriad background galaxies flung across space and time. Credits: NASA, ESA, A. Koekemoer (STScI), M. Jauzac (Durham University), C. Steinhardt (Niels Bohr Institute), and the BUFFALO team

Hubble Goes Wide to Seek Out Far-Flung Galaxies

Hubble Goes Wide to Seek Out Far-Flung Galaxies The universe is a big place. The Hubble Space Telescope’s views burrow deep into space and time, but cover an area a fraction the angular size of the full Moon. The challenge is that these “core samples” of the sky may not…

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Image Credit: ESA (European Space Agency)/Hubble & NASA, RELICS

Hubble’s Dazzling Display of Galaxies

Hubble’s Dazzling Display of Galaxies This busy image is a treasure trove of wonders. Bright stars from the Milky Way sparkle in the foreground, the magnificent swirls of several spiral galaxies are visible across the frame, and a glowing assortment of objects at the center makes up a massive galaxy…

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When galaxies align. NASA

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter When galaxies align. NASA Thomas Collett, University of Portsmouth Gravity may be the weakest of the fundamental forces in nature, but it is ultimately what enabled life on Earth to evolve.…

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At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in space; they swarm together, gathered up by the unyielding hand of gravity, to form groups and clusters. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, which is part of the Virgo Cluster, which in turn is part of the 100 000-galaxy-strong Laniakea Supercluster. The galaxy cluster seen in this image is known as SDSS J0333+0651. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in…

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This image shows the the huge galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+223, whose light has taken over 5 billion years to reach us. Highlighted is the position where the star LS1 appeared — its image magnified by a factor 2000 by gravitational microlensing. The galaxy in which the star is located can be seen three times on the sky — multiplied by strong gravitational lensing. Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Rodney (John Hopkins University, USA) and the FrontierSN team; T. Treu (University of California Los Angeles, USA), P. Kelly (University of California Berkeley, USA) and the GLASS team; J. Lotz (STScI) and the Frontier Fields team; M. Postman (STScI) and the CLASH team; and Z. Levay (STScI)

Hubble uses cosmic lens to discover most distant star ever observed

Hubble uses cosmic lens to discover most distant star ever observed Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found the most distant star ever discovered. The hot blue star existed only 4.4 billion years after the Big Bang. This discovery provides new insight into the formation and evolution of…

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Icarus, whose official name is MACS J1149+2223 Lensed Star 1, is the farthest individual star ever seen. It is only visible because it is being magnified by the gravity of a massive galaxy cluster, located about 5 billion light-years from Earth. Called MACS J1149+2223, this cluster, shown at left, sits between Earth and the galaxy that contains the distant star. The panels at the right show the view in 2011, without Icarus visible, compared with the star's brightening in 2016. Credits: NASA, ESA, and P. Kelly (University of Minnesota)

Hubble Uncovers the Farthest Star Ever Seen

Hubble Uncovers the Farthest Star Ever Seen More than halfway across the universe, an enormous blue star nicknamed Icarus is the farthest individual star ever seen. Normally, it would be much too faint to view, even with the world’s largest telescopes. But through a quirk of nature that tremendously amplifies…

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This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy cluster PLCK G004.5-19.5. It was discovered by the ESA Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect — the distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation in the direction of the galaxy cluster, by high energy electrons in the intracluster gas. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, RELICS; Acknowledgement: D. Coe et al.

Hubble’s Window into the Cosmic Past

Hubble’s Window into the Cosmic Past This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy cluster PLCK G004.5-19.5. It was discovered by the ESA Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zel’dovich effect — the distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation in the direction of the galaxy cluster by high-energy…

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ESA/Hubble, NASA, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Palomar Observatory/California Institute of Technology. CC 4.0 International

New Type Ia supernova discovered using gravitational lensing

New Type Ia supernova discovered using gravitational lensing Using gravitational lensing, an international team of astronomers has detected a new Type Ia supernova. The newly discovered lensed supernova was found behind the galaxy cluster known as MOO J1014+0038. The findings were detailed in a paper published July 14 on the…

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In this Hubble photograph of a distant galaxy cluster, a spotty blue arc stands out against a background of red galaxies. That arc is actually three separate images of the same background galaxy. The background galaxy has been gravitationally lensed, its light magnified and distorted by the intervening galaxy cluster. On the right: How the galaxy would look to Hubble without distortions. Credits: NASA, ESA, and T. Johnson (University of Michigan)

Hubble Pushed Beyond Limits to Spot Clumps of New Stars in Distant Galaxy

Hubble Pushed Beyond Limits to Spot Clumps of New Stars in Distant Galaxy When it comes to the distant universe, even the keen vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope can only go so far. Teasing out finer details requires clever thinking and a little help from a cosmic alignment with…

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The gravity of galaxies bends space, such that the light traveling through this space is bent. This bending of light allows astronomers to measure the distribution of gravity around galaxies, even up to distances a hundred times larger than the galaxy itself. Photo credit: APS/Alan Stonebraker; galaxy images from STScI/AURA, NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team

Verlinde’s New Theory of Gravity Passes First Test

Verlinde’s New Theory of Gravity Passes First Test A team led by astronomer Margot Brouwer (Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands) has tested the new theory of theoretical physicist Erik Verlinde (University of Amsterdam) for the first time through the lensing effect of gravity. Brouwer and her team measured the distribution of…

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Massive cluster of galaxies Abell 1689 creates a strong gravitational effect on background and older galaxies, seen as arcs of light. Image credit: NASA, ESA, B. Siana, and A. Alavi

Large Number of Dwarf Galaxies Discovered in the Early Universe

Large Number of Dwarf Galaxies Discovered in the Early Universe A UC Riverside-lead team of astronomers has discovered a large number of dwarf galaxies in the early universe by using the gravitational lensing phenomenon, completing astronomers’ census of star-forming galaxies in that epoch A team of researchers, led by University…

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