Space Breaking News:

U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence speaks about the creation of a United States Space Force on Aug. 9, 2018 at the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How Canadian technology could protect Space Force troops

How Canadian technology could protect Space Force troops U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence speaks about the creation of a United States Space Force on Aug. 9, 2018 at the Pentagon. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) Fiona E. McNeill, McMaster University U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence has announced that the United States plans to establish…

View More How Canadian technology could protect Space Force troops

Shutterstock

Space tourism economics – financing and regulating trips to the final frontier

Space tourism economics – financing and regulating trips to the final frontier Shutterstock Loizos Heracleous, Warwick Business School, University of Warwick American engineer and businessman Dennis Tito paid US$20m in 2001 to become the world’s first official space tourist. He travelled to the International Space Station (ISS) on a Russian…

View More Space tourism economics – financing and regulating trips to the final frontier

Blast off. Sergey Nivens

Eight ethical questions about exploring outer space that need answers

Eight ethical questions about exploring outer space that need answers Blast off. Sergey Nivens Benjamin Sachs, University of St Andrews Metallic shrapnel flying faster than bullets; the Space Shuttle smashed to pieces; astronauts killed or ejected into space. The culprit? Space debris – remnants of a Russian satellite blown up…

View More Eight ethical questions about exploring outer space that need answers

NASA astronaut Alexander Gerst learns how to use a sextant. “I learned how to navigate after the stars using a sextant,” said Gerst. “It’s actually a test for a backup nav method for #Orion & future deep space missions.” Credits: NASA

Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device

Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device A tool that has helped guide sailors across oceans for centuries is now being tested aboard the International Space Station as a potential emergency navigation tool for guiding future spacecraft across the cosmos. The Sextant Navigation investigation tests use of a hand-held sextant aboard the…

View More Deep Space Navigation: Tool Tested as Emergency Navigation Device

Mission specialist Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly in space. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering

Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering Mission specialist Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly in space. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Bonnie J. Dunbar, Texas A&M University On June 18, 1983, 35 years ago, Sally Ride became the first…

View More Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering

Credit: NASA

Record-Setting NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson Retires

Record-Setting NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson Retires NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, who holds the U.S. record for most cumulative time in space, is retiring from the agency, effective Friday. “Peggy Whitson is a testament to the American spirit,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “Her determination, strength of mind, character, and dedication…

View More Record-Setting NASA Astronaut Peggy Whitson Retires

NASA’s latest carbon-observing space mission is the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, which is making unprecedented global measurements of carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. Credits: NASA

NASA Invested in Cracking Earth’s Carbon Puzzle

NASA Invested in Cracking Earth’s Carbon Puzzle It’s a scientific conundrum with huge implications for our future: How will our planet react to the increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? That seemingly simple question is particularly tricky because carbon – an essential building block for life on Earth…

View More NASA Invested in Cracking Earth’s Carbon Puzzle

Satellites (U.S. Air Force illustration)

Small sats are vital to Australia’s space industry – and they won’t be space junk

Small sats are vital to Australia’s space industry – and they won’t be space junk Small satellites are launched to Low Earth Orbit – and then eventually burn up. from www.shutterstock.com Michael Smart, The University of Queensland Today the federal government released its response to the review of Australia’s Space…

View More Small sats are vital to Australia’s space industry – and they won’t be space junk

The ISS sees us on Earth, but look up at night and you may see it, too. NASA , CC BY

Look up – it’s a satellite!

Look up – it’s a satellite! The ISS sees us on Earth, but look up at night and you may see it, too. NASA , CC BY Christopher Palma, Pennsylvania State University I saw my first artificial satellite with my naked eyes during the summer of 1994. I was watching…

View More Look up – it’s a satellite!

Follow NASA's TSIS-1 from its launch to its installation aboard the International Space Station to its collection of science data. Credits: NASA Goddard

NASA Powers on New Instrument Staring at the Sun

NASA Powers on New Instrument Staring at the Sun NASA has powered on its latest space payload to continue long-term measurements of the Sun’s incoming energy. Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1), installed on the International Space Station, became fully operational with all instruments collecting science data as of…

View More NASA Powers on New Instrument Staring at the Sun

Astronaut Peggy Whitson aboard the International Space Station. NASA

Curious Kids: Where does the oxygen come from in the International Space Station, and why don’t they run out of air?

Curious Kids: Where does the oxygen come from in the International Space Station, and why don’t they run out of air? The first piece of the International Space Station was launched in 1998. Wikimedia Commons/NASA, CC BY Michael J. I. Brown, Monash University This is an article from Curious Kids,…

View More Curious Kids: Where does the oxygen come from in the International Space Station, and why don’t they run out of air?

NASA

Message to the gods: the space poetry that transcends human rivalries

Message to the gods: the space poetry that transcends human rivalries NASA Phil Leonard, Nottingham Trent University Sputnik 1 started it all. The beachball-sized satellite was launched by the Soviet Union on October 4, 1957 and, despite a relatively short mission of only 21 days in orbit around Earth, quickly…

View More Message to the gods: the space poetry that transcends human rivalries

Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson suits up ahead of a spacewalk. Vomiting inside a spacesuit during a spacewalk could be fatal for astronauts. NASA, CC BY

Curious Kids: Do astronauts get space sick when they travel from Earth to the International Space Station?

Curious Kids: Do astronauts get space sick when they travel from Earth to the International Space Station? Flight Engineer Peggy Whitson suits up ahead of a spacewalk. Vomiting inside a spacesuit during a spacewalk could be fatal for astronauts. NASA, CC BY Kevin Orrman-Rossiter, University of Melbourne This is an…

View More Curious Kids: Do astronauts get space sick when they travel from Earth to the International Space Station?

NASA/Paolo Nespoli

Space babies: study suggests humans may be able to have healthy offspring in orbit

Space babies: study suggests humans may be able to have healthy offspring in orbit ISS and Endeavour seen from the Soyuz TMA spacecraft. NASA Adam Watkins, Aston University When we think about the difficulties of colonising another planet, the last thing we probably worry about about is sex. However, for…

View More Space babies: study suggests humans may be able to have healthy offspring in orbit