To celebrate its 28th anniversary in space the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope took this amazing and colourful image of the Lagoon Nebula. The whole nebula, about 4000 light-years away, is an incredible 55 light-years wide and 20 light-years tall. This image shows only a small part of this turbulent star-formation region, about four light-years across. This stunning nebula was first catalogued in 1654 by the Italian astronomer Giovanni Battista Hodierna, who sought to record nebulous objects in the night sky so they would not be mistaken for comets. Since Hodierna’s observations, the Lagoon Nebula has been photographed and analysed by many telescopes and astronomers all over the world. The observations were taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 between 12 February and 18 February 2018. Credit: NASA, ESA, STScI

Hubble celebrates 28th anniversary with a trip through the Lagoon Nebula

Hubble celebrates 28th anniversary with a trip through the Lagoon Nebula This colourful cloud of glowing interstellar gas is just a tiny part of the…

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These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble’s 28th anniversary in space. Credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery

Two Hubble Views of the Same Stellar Nursery These NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast…

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The OmegaCAM imager on ESO’s VLT Survey Telescope has captured this glittering view of the stellar nursery called Sharpless 29. Many astronomical phenomena can be seen in this giant image, including cosmic dust and gas clouds that reflect, absorb, and re-emit the light of hot young stars within the nebula. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

Stellar Nursery Blooms into View

Stellar Nursery Blooms into View The OmegaCAM camera on ESO’s VLT Survey Telescope has captured this glittering view of the stellar nursery called Sharpless 29.…

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The spectacular planetary nebula NGC 7009, or the Saturn Nebula, emerges from the darkness like a series of oddly-shaped bubbles, lit up in glorious pinks and blues. This colourful image was captured by the powerful MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), as part of a study which mapped the dust inside a planetary nebula for the first time. Credit: ESO/J. Walsh

The Strange Structures of the Saturn Nebula

The Strange Structures of the Saturn Nebula The spectacular planetary nebula NGC 7009, or the Saturn Nebula, emerges from the darkness like a series of…

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OmegaCAM — the wide-field optical camera on ESO’s VLT Survey Telescope (VST) — has captured the spectacular Orion Nebula and its associated cluster of young stars in great detail,  producing this beautiful new image. This famous object, the birthplace of many massive stars, is one of the closest stellar nurseries, at a distance of about 1350 light-years. Credit: ESO/G. Beccari

A Tale of Three Stellar Cities

A Tale of Three Stellar Cities Using new observations from ESO’s VLT Survey Telescope, astronomers have discovered three different populations of young stars within the…

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In this composite image combining GBT radio and WISE infrared observations, the filament of ammonia molecules appears red and Orion Nebula gas appears blue. Image: R. Friesen, Dunlap Institute; J. Pineda, MPE; GBO/AUI/NSF

Radio Astronomers Peer Deep into the Stellar Nursery of the Orion Nebula

Radio Astronomers Peer Deep into the Stellar Nursery of the Orion Nebula Astronomers have released an image of a vast filament of star-forming gas, 1200…

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Astronomers discovered a real "tell-tale heart" in space, 6,500 light-years from Earth. The "heart" is the crushed core of a long-dead star, called a neutron star, which exploded as a supernova and is now still beating with rhythmic precision. Evidence of its heartbeat are rapid-fire, lighthouse-like pulses of energy from the fast-spinning neutron star. The stellar relic is embedded in the center of the Crab Nebula, the expanding, tattered remains of the doomed star. Credits: NASA and ESA, Acknowledgment: M. Weisskopf/Marshall Space Flight Center

A Dead Star’s Ghostly Glow

A Dead Star’s Ghostly Glow The eerie glow of a dead star, which exploded long ago as a supernova, reveals itself in this NASA Hubble…

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This image of the Stingray nebula, a planetary nebula 2700 light-years from Earth, was taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) in 1998. In the centre of the nebula the fast evolving star SAO 244567 is located. Observations made within the last 45 years showed that the surface temperature of the star increased by almost 40 000 degree Celsius. Now new observations of the spectra of the star have revealed that SAO 244567 has started to cool again. Image credit: NASA, ESA/Hubble

Astronomers observe star reborn in a flash

Astronomers observe star reborn in a flash An international team of astronomers using Hubble have been able to study stellar evolution in real time. Over…

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