Triple star system involving a pulsar suggests Einstein was right. Kevin Gill/Flickr, CC BY-ND

Free-falling dead stars show that a cornerstone of physics holds up

Free-falling dead stars show that a cornerstone of physics holds up Triple star system involving a pulsar suggests Einstein was right. Kevin Gill/Flickr, CC BY-ND…

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The Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), a network of thousands of linked radio antennas, primarily located in the Netherlands, has discovered two new millisecond pulsars by investigating previously unknown gamma-ray sources uncovered by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Pulsar J0952-0607, highlighted near center right, rotates 707 times a second and now ranks as second-fastest pulsar known. The location of LOFAR's first millisecond pulsar discovery, J1552+5437, which spins 412 times a second, is shown at upper left. Radio emission from both pulsars dims quickly at higher radio frequencies, making them ideally suited for LOFAR. The top of this composite image shows a portion of the gamma-ray sky as seen by Fermi. At the bottom is the LOFAR "superterp" near Exloo, the Netherlands, which houses the facility's core antenna stations. Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and ASTRON

‘Extreme’ Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar

‘Extreme’ Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar By following up on mysterious high-energy sources mapped out by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Netherlands-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio…

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Sagittarius region of milky way. Credit: Wikipedia

Astronomers find black hole in Sagittarius constellation

Astronomers find black hole in Sagittarius constellation Astronomers find black hole in Sagittarius constellationAn international team of astronomers led The University of Manchester have found…

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Artist’s rendition of a typical millisecond pulsar binary system in which the shape of the companion star (l.) is deformed by the gravitational pull of the pulsar (r.) seen emitting beams of radiation. Credit: NASA

Amateur Astronomer Helps Uncover Secrets of Unique Pulsar Binary System

Amateur Astronomer Helps Uncover Secrets of Unique Pulsar Binary System astrophysicist and an amateur astronomer have teamed up to reveal surprising details about an unusual…

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Astronomers discovered a real "tell-tale heart" in space, 6,500 light-years from Earth. The "heart" is the crushed core of a long-dead star, called a neutron star, which exploded as a supernova and is now still beating with rhythmic precision. Evidence of its heartbeat are rapid-fire, lighthouse-like pulses of energy from the fast-spinning neutron star. The stellar relic is embedded in the center of the Crab Nebula, the expanding, tattered remains of the doomed star. Credits: NASA and ESA, Acknowledgment: M. Weisskopf/Marshall Space Flight Center

A Dead Star’s Ghostly Glow

A Dead Star’s Ghostly Glow The eerie glow of a dead star, which exploded long ago as a supernova, reveals itself in this NASA Hubble…

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