Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of the supernova remnant HBH3 in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The puffy, white feature in the image is a portion of the star forming regions W3, W4 and W5. Infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns have been mapped to blue, and 4.5 microns to red. The white color of the star-forming region is a combination of both wavelengths, while the HBH3 filaments radiate only at the longer 4.5 micron wavelength. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPAC

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star

The Fading Ghost of a Long-Dead Star Thin, red veins of energized gas mark the location of one of the larger supernova remnants in the…

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Artist’s impression based on real picture of Icecube lab. IceCube/NSF

Scientists discover a new source of neutrinos in space – opening up another window into the universe

Scientists discover a new source of neutrinos in space – opening up another window into the universe Artist’s impression based on real picture of Icecube…

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Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF., Author provided

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star…

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An illustration of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which has now been studying the extreme universe for a decade. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Conceptual Image Lab

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries

NASA’s Fermi Satellite Celebrates 10 Years of Discoveries On June 11, NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope celebrates a decade of using gamma rays, the highest-energy form of…

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Glowing brightly about 160 000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our Milky Way. This image from VLT Survey Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile shows the region and its rich surroundings in great detail. It reveals a cosmic landscape of star clusters, glowing gas clouds and the scattered remains of supernova explosions. Credit: ESO

A Crowded Neighbourhood

A Crowded Neighbourhood Glowing brightly about 160 000 light-years away, the Tarantula Nebula is the most spectacular feature of the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite…

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A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

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X-ray “heartbeats” of two different black holes that ingest gas from their companion stars. GRS 1915 has nearly five times the mass of IGR J17091, which at three solar masses may be the smallest black hole known. Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’ NASA’s decommissioned Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite re-entered Earth’s atmosphere on April 30. Orbiting for…

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Top-down artist depiction of a tiny black hole and a pileup of gas and matter swirling toward the center. NASA

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after ‘listening’ to the universe

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after ‘listening’ to the universe Top-down artist depiction of a tiny black hole and a pileup of gas and…

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Seventeen years ago, astronomers witnessed supernova 2001ig go off 40 million light-years away in the galaxy NGC 7424, in the southern constellation Grus, the Crane. Shortly after, scientists photographed the supernova with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in 2002. Two years later, they followed up with the Gemini South Observatory, which hinted at the presence of a surviving binary companion. As the supernova’s glow faded, scientists focused Hubble on that location in 2016. They pinpointed and photographed the surviving companion, which was possible only due to Hubble’s exquisite resolution and ultraviolet sensitivity. Hubble observations of SN 2001ig provide the best evidence yet that some supernovas originate in double-star systems. Credits: NASA, ESA, S. Ryder (Australian Astronomical Observatory), and O. Fox (STScI)

Stellar Thief Is the Surviving Companion to a Supernova

Stellar Thief Is the Surviving Companion to a Supernova Seventeen years ago, astronomers witnessed a supernova go off 40 million light-years away in the galaxy…

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Gaia’s view of our Milky Way and neighbouring galaxies. ESA/Gaia/DPAC, CC BY-SA

Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us

Gaia mission releases map of more than a billion stars – here’s what it can teach us Gaia’s view of our Milky Way and neighbouring…

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This new picture created from images from telescopes on the ground and in space tells the story of the hunt for an elusive missing object hidden amid a complex tangle of gaseous filaments in one of our nearest neighbouring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The reddish background image comes from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and reveals the wisps of gas forming the supernova remnant 1E 0102.2-7219 in green. The red ring with a dark centre is from the MUSE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope and the blue and purple images are from the NASA Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The blue spot at the centre of the red ring is an isolated neutron star with a weak magnetic field, the first identified outside the Milky Way. Credit: ESO/NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)/F. Vogt et al.

Dead Star Circled by Light

Dead Star Circled by Light New images from ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile and other telescopes reveal a rich landscape of stars and glowing…

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This image shows the the huge galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+223, whose light has taken over 5 billion years to reach us. Highlighted is the position where the star LS1 appeared — its image magnified by a factor 2000 by gravitational microlensing. The galaxy in which the star is located can be seen three times on the sky — multiplied by strong gravitational lensing. Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Rodney (John Hopkins University, USA) and the FrontierSN team; T. Treu (University of California Los Angeles, USA), P. Kelly (University of California Berkeley, USA) and the GLASS team; J. Lotz (STScI) and the Frontier Fields team; M. Postman (STScI) and the CLASH team; and Z. Levay (STScI)

Hubble uses cosmic lens to discover most distant star ever observed

Hubble uses cosmic lens to discover most distant star ever observed Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have found the most distant star ever…

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This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (The Winged Horse). Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA/D. Milisavljevic (Purdue University)

Hubble’s Majestic Spiral in Pegasus

Hubble’s Majestic Spiral in Pegasus This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy…

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