An image of the galaxy Arp299B, which is undergoing a merging process with Arp299A (the galaxy to the left), captured by NASA's Hubble space telescope. The inset features an artist's illustration of a tidal disruption event (TDE), which occurs when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. A TDE was recently observed near the center of Arp299B. Credits: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA, STScI

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star For the first time, astronomers have directly imaged the formation and expansion of a fast-moving jet…

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A new study involving long-term monitoring of Alpha Centauri by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory indicates that any planets orbiting the two brightest stars are likely not being pummeled by large amounts of X-ray radiation from their host stars. This is important for the viability of life in the nearest star system outside the Solar System. Chandra data from May 2nd, 2017 are seen in the pull-out, which is shown in context of a visible-light image taken from the ground of the Alpha Centauri system and its surroundings. Alpha Centauri is a triple star system located just over four light years, or about 25 trillion miles, from Earth. While this is a large distance in terrestrial terms, it is three times closer than the next nearest Sun-like star. Credits: Optical: Zdenek Bardon; X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ. of Colorado/T. Ayres et al.

Chandra Scouts Nearest Star System for Possible Hazards

Chandra Scouts Nearest Star System for Possible Hazards In humanity’s search for life outside our Solar System, one of the best places scientists have considered…

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A composite image of the supernova 1E0102.2-7219 contains X-rays from Chandra (blue and purple), visible light data from VLT’s MUSE instrument (bright red), and additional data from Hubble (dark red and green). A neutron star, the ultra dense core of a massive star that collapses and undergoes a supernova explosion, is found at its center. Credits: X-ray (NASA/CXC/ESO/F.Vogt et al); Optical (ESO/VLT/MUSE & NASA/STScI)

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star

Astronomers Spot a Distant and Lonely Neutron Star Astronomers have discovered a special kind of neutron star for the first time outside of the Milky…

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Image credit: NASA/CXC/Columbia Univ./C. Hailey et al.

Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center

Black Hole Bounty Captured in the Milky Way Center Astronomers have discovered evidence for thousands of black holes located near the center of our Milky…

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X-ray “heartbeats” of two different black holes that ingest gas from their companion stars. GRS 1915 has nearly five times the mass of IGR J17091, which at three solar masses may be the smallest black hole known. Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’ NASA’s decommissioned Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite re-entered Earth’s atmosphere on April 30. Orbiting for…

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Top-down artist depiction of a tiny black hole and a pileup of gas and matter swirling toward the center. NASA

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after ‘listening’ to the universe

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ends mission after ‘listening’ to the universe Top-down artist depiction of a tiny black hole and a pileup of gas and…

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The Milky Way seen in infrared. NASA/JPL-Caltech/S. Stolovy (SSC/Caltech)

Astronomers may have just discovered a dozen black holes in the centre of our galaxy

Astronomers may have just discovered a dozen black holes in the centre of our galaxy The Milky Way seen in infrared. NASA/JPL-Caltech/S. Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) Phil…

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The Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy here seen in infrared light, but it looks different when viewed at other wavelengths. ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI

Looking at the universe through very different ‘eyes’

Looking at the universe through very different ‘eyes’ The Small Magellanic Cloud galaxy here seen in infrared light, but it looks different when viewed at…

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A visualization of the center of our galaxy. Credits: NASA/CXC/Pontifical Catholic Univ. of Chile /C.Russell et al.

Scientists Take Viewers to the Center of the Milky Way

Scientists Take Viewers to the Center of the Milky Way CORRECTION (Earth’s distance from the Milky Way’s center was erroneously reported. 150,000 trillion miles is…

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Simulation of two neutron stars merging. NASA/AEI/ZIB/M. Koppitz and L. Rezzolla, CC BY

Why astrophysicists are over the moon about observing merging neutron stars

Why astrophysicists are over the moon about observing merging neutron stars Simulation of two neutron stars merging. NASA/AEI/ZIB/M. Koppitz and L. Rezzolla, CC BY Roy…

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Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab

NASA Missions Catch First Light from a Gravitational-Wave Event

NASA Missions Catch First Light from a Gravitational-Wave Event For the first time, NASA scientists have detected light tied to a gravitational-wave event, thanks to…

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Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are of most concern to NASA. It is challenging to shield against GCRs. They come from exploding stars called supernovae. Credits: NASA

Positive, Negative or Neutral, It All Matters: NASA Explains Space Radiation

Positive, Negative or Neutral, It All Matters: NASA Explains Space Radiation Charged particles may be small, but they matter to astronauts. NASA’s Human Research Program…

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The Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), a network of thousands of linked radio antennas, primarily located in the Netherlands, has discovered two new millisecond pulsars by investigating previously unknown gamma-ray sources uncovered by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Pulsar J0952-0607, highlighted near center right, rotates 707 times a second and now ranks as second-fastest pulsar known. The location of LOFAR's first millisecond pulsar discovery, J1552+5437, which spins 412 times a second, is shown at upper left. Radio emission from both pulsars dims quickly at higher radio frequencies, making them ideally suited for LOFAR. The top of this composite image shows a portion of the gamma-ray sky as seen by Fermi. At the bottom is the LOFAR "superterp" near Exloo, the Netherlands, which houses the facility's core antenna stations. Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and ASTRON

‘Extreme’ Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar

‘Extreme’ Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar By following up on mysterious high-energy sources mapped out by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Netherlands-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio…

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