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A brief history of black holes

A brief history of black holes Cepheia/Shutterstock.com Carla Rodrigues Almeida, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Late in 2018, the gravitational wave observatory, LIGO, announced that they had detected the most distant and massive source of ripples of spacetime ever monitored: waves triggered by pairs of black holes…

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Ripples in space-time caused by massive events such this artist rendition of a pair of merging neutron stars. Carl Knox, OzGrav, Author provided

New detections of gravitational waves brings the number to 11 – so far

New detections of gravitational waves brings the number to 11 – so far Ripples in space-time caused by massive events such this artist rendition of a pair of merging neutron stars. Carl Knox, OzGrav, Author provided  David Blair, University of Western Australia Four new detections of gravitational waves have been…

View More New detections of gravitational waves brings the number to 11 – so far

On Sept. 22, 2017, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole, represented in this illustration by strings of sensors under the ice, detected a high-energy neutrino that appeared to come from deep space. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (center left) pinpointed the source as a supermassive black hole in a galaxy about 4 billion light-years away. It is the first high-energy neutrino source identified from outside our galaxy. Credits: NASA/Fermi and Aurore Simonnet, Sonoma State University

Multimessenger Links to NASA’s Fermi Mission Show How Luck Favors the Prepared

Multimessenger Links to NASA’s Fermi Mission Show How Luck Favors the Prepared In 2017, NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope played a pivotal role in two important breakthroughs occurring just five weeks apart. But what might seem like extraordinary good luck is really the product of research, analysis, preparation and development…

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Visible light image of the radio galaxy Hercules A obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope superposed with a radio image taken by the Very Large Array of radio telescopes in New Mexico, USA. NASA

We’ve spotted signs of mergers that may finally help us prove that supermassive black holes exist

We’ve spotted signs of mergers that may finally help us prove that supermassive black holes exist Visible light image of the radio galaxy Hercules A obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope superposed with a radio image taken by the Very Large Array of radio telescopes in New Mexico, USA. NASA…

View More We’ve spotted signs of mergers that may finally help us prove that supermassive black holes exist

a frozen version of black hole merger simulation Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

New Simulation Sheds Light on Spiraling Supermassive Black Holes

New Simulation Sheds Light on Spiraling Supermassive Black Holes A new model is bringing scientists a step closer to understanding the kinds of light signals produced when two supermassive black holes, which are millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun, spiral toward a collision. For the first…

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Illustrations of Neutron Merger and Black Hole A new study using Chandra data of GW170817 indicates that the event that produced gravitational waves likely created the lowest mass black hole known. (Credit: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss)

New era of astronomy uncovers clues about the cosmos

New era of astronomy uncovers clues about the cosmos An illustration of two neutron stars spinning around each other while merging. NASA/CXC/Trinity University/D. Pooley et al. Gregory Sivakoff, University of Alberta and Daryl Haggard, McGill University Astronomers have had a blockbuster year. In addition to tracking down a cosmic source…

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This image of Comet Lulin was taken by Swift on January 28, 2009. It shows data obtained by Swift’s Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (blue and green) and X-Ray Telescope (red). The image of the star field (white) was acquired by the Digital Sky Survey. At the time of the observation, comet Lulin was 99.5 million miles from Earth and 115.3 million miles from the sun. The ultraviolet light comes from hydroxyl molecules and shows that, at this time, Lulin was shedding 800 gallons of water every second. D. Bodewits/Swift/NASA, CC BY-ND

Swift’s telescope reveals birth, deaths and collisions of stars through 1 million snapshots in UV

Swift’s telescope reveals birth, deaths and collisions of stars through 1 million snapshots in UV Technicians prepare Swift’s UVOT for vibration testing on Aug. 1, 2002, more than two years before launch, in the High Bay Clean Room at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. NASA’s Goddard Space…

View More Swift’s telescope reveals birth, deaths and collisions of stars through 1 million snapshots in UV

An artist’s depiction of a pair of neutron stars colliding. NASA/Swift/Dana Berry

We’re going to get a better detector: time for upgrades in the search for gravitational waves

We’re going to get a better detector: time for upgrades in the search for gravitational waves An artist’s depiction of a pair of neutron stars colliding. NASA/Swift/Dana Berry Robert Ward, Australian National University It’s been a year since ripples in space-time from a colliding pair of dead stars tickled the…

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Neutron star merger. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab

Signals from a spectacular neutron star merger that made gravitational waves are slowly fading away

Signals from a spectacular neutron star merger that made gravitational waves are slowly fading away Neutron star merger. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/CI Lab Tara Murphy, University of Sydney and David Kaplan, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Eight months ago, the detection of gravitational waves from a binary neutron star merger…

View More Signals from a spectacular neutron star merger that made gravitational waves are slowly fading away

The Milky Way seen in infrared. NASA/JPL-Caltech/S. Stolovy (SSC/Caltech)

Astronomers may have just discovered a dozen black holes in the centre of our galaxy

Astronomers may have just discovered a dozen black holes in the centre of our galaxy The Milky Way seen in infrared. NASA/JPL-Caltech/S. Stolovy (SSC/Caltech) Phil Charles, University of Southampton Astronomers first noticed an enigmatic object, dubbed “Sagittarius A*”, at the very heart of our Milky Way galaxy in the 1960s…

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ns gw art.

Explainer: why you can hear gravitational waves when things collide in the universe

Explainer: why you can hear gravitational waves when things collide in the universe ns gw art. David Blair, University of Western Australia Whenever there’s an announcement of a new discovery of gravitational waves there is usually an accompanying sound, such as this: The sound of first gravitational waves detected. We…

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Astronomers using ESO’s MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope in Chile have discovered a star in the cluster NGC 3201 that is behaving very strangely. It appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the Sun — the first such inactive stellar-mass black hole found in a globular cluster. This important discovery impacts on our understanding of the formation of these star clusters, black holes, and the origins of gravitational wave events.This artist’s impression shows how the star and its massive but invisible black hole companion may look, in the rich heart of the globular star cluster. Credit: ESO/L. Calçada/spaceengine.org

Odd Behaviour of Star Reveals Lonely Black Hole Hiding in Giant Star Cluster

Odd Behaviour of Star Reveals Lonely Black Hole Hiding in Giant Star Cluster Astronomers using ESO’s MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope in Chile have discovered a star in the cluster NGC 3201 that is behaving very strangely. It appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about…

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Artist s impression of merging neutron stars. Author University of Warwick/Mark Garlick, CC BY-SA

How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what ‘dark energy’ is

How crashing neutron stars killed off some of our best ideas about what ‘dark energy’ is Artist s impression of merging neutron stars. Author University of Warwick/Mark Garlick, CC BY-SA Thomas Kitching, UCL There was much excitement when scientists witnessed the violent collision of two ultra-dense, massive stars more than…

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This computer simulation shows the collision of two black holes, which produces gravitational waves. Credits: SXS

Listening for Gravitational Waves Using Pulsars

Listening for Gravitational Waves Using Pulsars One of the most spectacular achievements in physics so far this century has been the observation of gravitational waves, ripples in space-time that result from masses accelerating in space. So far, there have been five detections of gravitational waves, thanks to the Laser Interferometer…

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