When galaxies align. NASA

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter

How we proved Einstein right on galactic scales – and what it means for dark energy and dark matter When galaxies align. NASA Thomas Collett,…

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Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF., Author provided

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death

Astronomers watch as black hole drags an exploding star to its death Artist conception of a tidal disruption event (TDE) that happens when a star…

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An image of the galaxy Arp299B, which is undergoing a merging process with Arp299A (the galaxy to the left), captured by NASA's Hubble space telescope. The inset features an artist's illustration of a tidal disruption event (TDE), which occurs when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. A TDE was recently observed near the center of Arp299B. Credits: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA, STScI

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star For the first time, astronomers have directly imaged the formation and expansion of a fast-moving jet…

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Artist's rendering of the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, scheduled to launch in May, 2018. GRACE-FO will track the evolution of Earth's water cycle by monitoring changes in the distribution of mass on Earth. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

GRACE-FO Turns on ‘Range Finder,’ Sees Mountain Effects

GRACE-FO Turns on ‘Range Finder,’ Sees Mountain Effects Recently Launched Twin Satellites Create ‘The Himalaya Plot’ Less than three weeks after launch, the Gravity Recovery…

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About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch?

Curious Kids: will the universe expand forever, or contract in a big crunch? About a century ago, we didn’t even know that galaxies existed. Mai…

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The NASA/ESA Solar Orbiter will capture the very first images of the Sun’s polar regions, where magnetic tension builds up and releases in a lively dance. Launching in 2020, Solar Orbiter’s study of the Sun will shed light on its magnetic structure and the many forces that shape solar activity. Credits: Spacecraft: ESA/ATG medialab; Sun: NASA/SDO/P. Testa (CfA)

New Views of Sun: 2 Missions Will Go Closer to Our Star Than Ever Before

New Views of Sun: 2 Missions Will Go Closer to Our Star Than Ever Before As we develop more and more powerful tools to peer…

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X-ray “heartbeats” of two different black holes that ingest gas from their companion stars. GRS 1915 has nearly five times the mass of IGR J17091, which at three solar masses may be the smallest black hole known. Credits: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’

NASA’s Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer Leaves Scientific ‘Treasure Trove’ NASA’s decommissioned Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite re-entered Earth’s atmosphere on April 30. Orbiting for…

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shows the progression of NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) investigation for the mission's first four years following its restart in December 2013. Green dots represent near-Earth objects. Gray dots represent all other asteroids which are mainly in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Yellow squares represent comets. Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/PSI

NASA’s NEOWISE Asteroid-Hunter Spacecraft — Four Years of Data

NASA’s NEOWISE Asteroid-Hunter Spacecraft — Four Years of Data NASA’s Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission has released its fourth year of survey…

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For the Earth, which is shaped like a ball, the force of gravity pulls you to the centre from every point on the ground. Cindy Zhi/The Conversation NY-BD-CC, CC BY-SA

Curious Kids: If Australia is at the bottom of the world, why are we the right way up?

Curious Kids: If Australia is at the bottom of the world, why are we the right way up? For the Earth, which is shaped like…

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Icarus, whose official name is MACS J1149+2223 Lensed Star 1, is the farthest individual star ever seen. It is only visible because it is being magnified by the gravity of a massive galaxy cluster, located about 5 billion light-years from Earth. Called MACS J1149+2223, this cluster, shown at left, sits between Earth and the galaxy that contains the distant star. The panels at the right show the view in 2011, without Icarus visible, compared with the star's brightening in 2016. Credits: NASA, ESA, and P. Kelly (University of Minnesota)

Hubble Uncovers the Farthest Star Ever Seen

Hubble Uncovers the Farthest Star Ever Seen More than halfway across the universe, an enormous blue star nicknamed Icarus is the farthest individual star ever…

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NGC 1052-DF2 resides about 65 million light-years away in the NGC 1052 Group, which is dominated by a massive elliptical galaxy called NGC 1052. This large, fuzzy-looking galaxy is so diffuse that astronomers can clearly see distant galaxies behind it. This ghostly galaxy is not well-formed. It does not look like a typical spiral galaxy, but it does not look like an elliptical galaxy either. Based on the colours of its globular clusters, the galaxy is about 10 billion years old. However, even the globular clusters are strange: they are twice as large as typical groups of stars. All of these oddities pale in comparison to the weirdest aspect of this galaxy: NGC 1052-DF2 is missing most, if not all, of its dark matter. The galaxy contains only a tiny fraction of dark matter that astronomers would expect for a galaxy this size. But how it formed is a complete mystery. Hubble took this image on 16 November 2017 using its Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credit: NASA, ESA, and P. van Dokkum (Yale University)

Hubble finds first galaxy in the local Universe without dark matter

Hubble finds first galaxy in the local Universe without dark matter An international team of researchers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and several other…

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What goes in doesn’t go out? NASA Goddard, CC BY

Black holes aren’t totally black, and other insights from Stephen Hawking’s groundbreaking work

Black holes aren’t totally black, and other insights from Stephen Hawking’s groundbreaking work What goes in doesn’t go out? NASA Goddard, CC BY  Christoph Adami,…

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