An image of the galaxy Arp299B, which is undergoing a merging process with Arp299A (the galaxy to the left), captured by NASA's Hubble space telescope. The inset features an artist's illustration of a tidal disruption event (TDE), which occurs when a star passes fatally close to a supermassive black hole. A TDE was recently observed near the center of Arp299B. Credits: Sophia Dagnello, NRAO/AUI/NSF; NASA, STScI

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star

Astronomers See Distant Eruption as Black Hole Destroys Star For the first time, astronomers have directly imaged the formation and expansion of a fast-moving jet…

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The Australia Telescope Compact Array in Narrabri, NSW. David Smyth/CSIRO, Author provided

After the alert: radio ‘eyes’ hunt the source of the gravitational waves

After the alert: radio ‘eyes’ hunt the source of the gravitational waves The Australia Telescope Compact Array in Narrabri, NSW. David Smyth/CSIRO, Author provided Tara…

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This ALMA image reveals much finer structure in the U Antliae shell than has previously been possible. Around 2700 years ago, U Antliae went through a short period of rapid mass loss. During this period of only a few hundred years, the material making up the shell seen in the new ALMA data was ejected at high speed. Examination of this shell in further detail also shows some evidence of thin, wispy clouds known as filamentary substructures. Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/F. Kerschbaum

Ageing Star Blows Off Smoky Bubble

Ageing Star Blows Off Smoky Bubble In the faint southern constellation of Antlia (The Air Pump) the careful observer with binoculars will spot a very…

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The Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), a network of thousands of linked radio antennas, primarily located in the Netherlands, has discovered two new millisecond pulsars by investigating previously unknown gamma-ray sources uncovered by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Pulsar J0952-0607, highlighted near center right, rotates 707 times a second and now ranks as second-fastest pulsar known. The location of LOFAR's first millisecond pulsar discovery, J1552+5437, which spins 412 times a second, is shown at upper left. Radio emission from both pulsars dims quickly at higher radio frequencies, making them ideally suited for LOFAR. The top of this composite image shows a portion of the gamma-ray sky as seen by Fermi. At the bottom is the LOFAR "superterp" near Exloo, the Netherlands, which houses the facility's core antenna stations. Credits: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration and ASTRON

‘Extreme’ Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar

‘Extreme’ Telescopes Find the Second-fastest-spinning Pulsar By following up on mysterious high-energy sources mapped out by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the Netherlands-based Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) radio…

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Sagittarius A*. This image was taken with NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Ellipses indicate light echoes. NASA/wikipedia

Astronomers to peer into a black hole for first time with new Event Horizon Telescope

Astronomers to peer into a black hole for first time with new Event Horizon Telescope We don’t know what the black hole at the centre…

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