Artist's illustration and X-ray image of "red nugget" galaxy Mrk 1216. Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/MTA-Eötvös University/N. Werner et al., Illustration: NASA/CXC/M. Weiss

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers

Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers About a decade ago, astronomers discovered a population of small, but massive galaxies called “red nuggets.” A new…

View More Red Nuggets’ Are Galactic Gold for Astronomers

At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the frame. However, this galaxy is far from the most interesting spectacle here — behind it sits a galaxy cluster. Galaxies are not randomly distributed in space; they swarm together, gathered up by the unyielding hand of gravity, to form groups and clusters. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, which is part of the Virgo Cluster, which in turn is part of the 100 000-galaxy-strong Laniakea Supercluster. The galaxy cluster seen in this image is known as SDSS J0333+0651. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia At first glance, this image is dominated by the vibrant glow of the swirling spiral to the lower left of the…

View More Hubble’s Galaxy Cluster Cornucopia

Artist impression of very young galaxy in the early universe. Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF; S. Dagnello

ALMA Finds Most-Distant Oxygen in the Universe

ALMA Finds Most-Distant Oxygen in the Universe Galaxy 13.28 billion light-years away shows surprising signs of chemical maturity Not long after the Big Bang, the…

View More ALMA Finds Most-Distant Oxygen in the Universe

This image shows the galaxy NGC 6744, about 30 million light-years away. It is one of 50 galaxies observed as part of the Hubble Space Telescope’s Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby Universe, offering an extensive resource for understanding the complexities of star formation and galaxy evolution. The image is a composite using both ultraviolet light and visible light, gathered with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credit: NASA, ESA, and the LEGUS team

Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet

Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet Using the unparalleled sharpness and ultraviolet observational capabilities of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, an international team of…

View More Hubble shows the local Universe in ultraviolet

Galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223 taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The inset image is the very distant galaxy MACS1149-JD1. ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, W. Zheng (JHU), M. Postman (STScI), the CLASH Team, Hashimoto et al., CC BY-SA

When did the lights first come on in the universe? A galaxy close to the dawn of time gives a clue

When did the lights first come on in the universe? A galaxy close to the dawn of time gives a clue Galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223…

View More When did the lights first come on in the universe? A galaxy close to the dawn of time gives a clue

These six images represent the variety of star-forming regions in nearby galaxies. The galaxies are part of the Hubble Space Telescope's Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), the sharpest, most comprehensive ultraviolet-light survey of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe. The six images consist of two dwarf galaxies (UGC 5340 and UGCA 281) and four large spiral galaxies (NGC 3368, NGC 3627, NGC 6744, and NGC 4258). The images are a blend of ultraviolet light and visible light from Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys. Credits: NASA/ESA/LEGUS team

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies Capitalizing on the unparalleled sharpness and spectral range of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, an international team…

View More Astronomers Release Most Complete Ultraviolet-Light Survey of Nearby Galaxies

The dark band is the Dark Doodad Nebula, a place where new stars and planets can form. Flickr/cafuego, CC BY-SA

A giant ‘singing’ cloud in space will help us to understand how star systems form

A giant ‘singing’ cloud in space will help us to understand how star systems form The dark band is the Dark Doodad Nebula, a place…

View More A giant ‘singing’ cloud in space will help us to understand how star systems form

The Sombrero galaxy reveals the extremes of age and shape. NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

From pancakes to soccer balls, new study shows how galaxies change shape as they age

From pancakes to soccer balls, new study shows how galaxies change shape as they age The Sombrero galaxy reveals the extremes of age and shape.…

View More From pancakes to soccer balls, new study shows how galaxies change shape as they age

A dark cloud of cosmic dust snakes across this spectacular wide field image, illuminated by the brilliant light of new stars. This dense cloud is a star-forming region called Lupus 3, where dazzlingly hot stars are born from collapsing masses of gas and dust. This image was created from images taken using the VLT Survey Telescope and the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope and is the most detailed image taken so far of this region. Credit: ESO/R. Colombari

Glory From Gloom

Glory From Gloom A dark cloud of cosmic dust snakes across this spectacular wide field image, illuminated by the brilliant light of new stars. This…

View More Glory From Gloom

Astronomers using ALMA have uncovered chemical “fingerprints” of methanol, dimethyl ether, and methyl formate in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The latter two molecules are the largest organic molecules ever conclusively detected outside the Milky Way. The far-infrared image on the left shows the full galaxy. The zoom-in image shows the star-forming region observed by ALMA. It is a combination of mid-infrared data from Spitzer and visible (H-alpha) data from the Blanco 4-meter telescope. Credit: NRAO/AUI/NSF; ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO); Herschel/ESA; NASA/JPL-Caltech; NOAO

Stellar Embryos in Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Contain Surprisingly Complex Organic Molecules

Stellar Embryos in Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Contain Surprisingly Complex Organic Molecules The nearby dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a chemically…

View More Stellar Embryos in Nearby Dwarf Galaxy Contain Surprisingly Complex Organic Molecules

ESO/UltraVISTA team. Acknowledgement: TERAPIX/CNRS/INSU/CASU, CC BY-SA

Study of distant galaxies challenges our understanding of how stars form

Study of distant galaxies challenges our understanding of how stars form ESO/UltraVISTA team. Acknowledgement: TERAPIX/CNRS/INSU/CASU, CC BY-SA Marie Martig, Liverpool John Moores University The most…

View More Study of distant galaxies challenges our understanding of how stars form

This image is part of a Hubble Space Telescope survey for low-mass stars, brown dwarfs, and planets in the Orion Nebula. Each symbol identifies a pair of objects, which can be seen in the symbol’s center as a single dot of light. Special image processing techniques were used to separate the starlight into a pair of objects. The thicker inner circle represents the primary body, and the thinner outer circle indicates the companion. The circles are color-coded: red for a planet; orange for a brown dwarf; and yellow for a star. Located in the upper left corner is a planet-planet pair in the absence of a parent star. In the middle of the right side is a pair of brown dwarfs. The portion of the Orion Nebula measures roughly four by three light-years. Credits: NASA , ESA, and G. Strampelli (STScI)

Hubble Finds Substellar Objects in the Orion Nebula

Hubble Finds Substellar Objects in the Orion Nebula In an unprecedented deep survey for small, faint objects in the Orion Nebula, astronomers using NASA’s Hubble…

View More Hubble Finds Substellar Objects in the Orion Nebula